If you had been coming tomorrow

santareno

New Member
Portugues
If you had been coming tomorrow, you would have meet my mother.<-----Example sentence from original thread title added to post by moderator (Florentia52)----->

I need to translate this sentence into Portuguese, but I don't urderstand the verbs( past perfect) with ''coming tomorrow''.
Please help me
 
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  • Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    This may look like past perfect, but is actually counterfactual hypothetical future.

    When are you coming? Oh, today? That's a pity. My mother is out of town and not coming back until tomorrow.
    If you had been coming tomorrow (if it were the case that your visit is tomorrow instead of today -- but of course we know this is not the case), then you could have met her.


    "Would have meet" is incorrect, and needs to use "met".
     

    santareno

    New Member
    Portugues
    Thank you for your answer. I agree with you. I have read this sentence in an English book for learners, and I found it strange
    (I type more an e)
     

    JJXR

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Would most people be more likely to say this:

    When are you coming? Oh, today? That's a pity. My mother is out of town and not coming back until tomorrow. If you were coming tomorrow, you would meet my mother.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "If you had been coming tomorrow" can be thought of as saying:

    "If your plan had been to come tomorrow"
    "If your schedule had you come tomorrow"

    I agree with post 2, and agree it should use "you would have met my mother" in English.

    Both actions are future: both you coming here tomorrow, and you meeting my mother. But they are theory -- they are "if A, then B". I am sure that is said in Portuguese in some other way.
     

    JJXR

    Senior Member
    Russian
    What are the two complete sentences you are comparing, and asking "which is more natural"?
    [X] When are you coming? Oh, today? That's a pity. My mother is out of town and not coming back until tomorrow. If you were coming tomorrow, you would meet my mother.

    [Y] When are you coming? Oh, today? That's a pity. My mother is out of town and not coming back until tomorrow. If you had been coming tomorrow, you would have met my mother.
     

    JJXR

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Does the following combination of tenses work:

    [Z] When are you coming? Oh, today? That's a pity. My mother is out of town and not coming back until tomorrow. If you were coming tomorrow, you would have met my mother.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Does the following combination of tenses work:

    [Z] When are you coming? Oh, today? That's a pity. My mother is out of town and not coming back until tomorrow. If you were coming tomorrow, you would have met my mother.
    It doesn't work for me, no: I think it's an incorrect mix of tenses.

    The dialogue suggests to me that the person is definitely coming today, not tomorrow, and so will not be able to meet the mother. In which case, the scenario depicted in the 'condition' (coming tomorrow and meeting the mother) is effectively the reverse of what will actually happen (i.e. the condition will not come true), and therefore I'd do it as: "If you had been coming tomorrow, you would have met my mother".
     
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