If you <will be><are> free tomorrow, let's talk tomorrow.

JJXR

Senior Member
Russian
Hello to all,

Thanks for reading my post.


Sample sentence:

1. If you <will be><are> free tomorrow, let's talk tomorrow.

Question:

Are both options correct?


Thanks a lot for any comments, corrections or suggestions!

Regards,
JJXR
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    For what it’s worth, I would only use “are,” and I would eliminate the redundancy:

    If you are free tomorrow, let’s talk then.

    Cross-posted. :)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Will be" makes a prediction about what will happen in the future.
    If you will be free tomorrow, we can talk then. You must decide now even though we won't talk until tomorrow.
    If you are free tomorrow, we can talk then. I'm going to allow you to wait until tomorrow to find out if you have free time. I'm not asking you to commit right now and the talking takes place tomorrow anyway.
    If John will be here tomorrow, we don't need to telephone him today. Here we have to make a prediction about tomorrow because the action may need to take place today.
    If John is here tomorrow, we don't have to telephone him today. We are going to wait until tomorrow to see if John is here. If he isn't here, we will time travel back to yesterday and telephone him.
     

    JJXR

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thanks for the explanation, Myridon. Why did you change "let's talk" to "we can talk"? Do your interpretations work for "let's talk"?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you will be free tomorrow, we can talk then – this doesn’t sound natural (although making it you’ll instead would help).

    A more idiomatic version would be: If you’re going to be free tomorrow, we can talk then.

    But (as has been said above) by far the best version is If you’re free tomorrow…
     

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hello to all,

    Thanks for reading my post.


    Sample sentence:

    1. If you <will be><are> free tomorrow, let's talk tomorrow.

    Question:

    Are both options correct?


    Thanks a lot for any comments, corrections or suggestions!

    Regards,
    JJXR
    "If you will be free tomorrow" is fine, provided that "will" means "willingness" and not "future time."
    Of course, in an isolated sentence like this, without any context, we can't see "willingness" on the part of the person that you are talking to; as a result, If you will be is not easy to process. Of the two choices, "If you are free tomorrow" is the default choice, which presents a scenario ("being free tomorrow") as factual/actualized, for the purposes of the sentence.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    "If you will be free tomorrow" is fine, provided that "will" means "willingness" and not "future time."
    I don't see any possibility here of will entailing volition. The reference is to the future.
    Like lingobingo in #7, however, I feel that If you're going to be free tomorrow sounds more idiomatic.

    An example of volition could be: I have an urgent appointment. If you will take my dog to the vet, that would be a great help.

    Here is another example, where will refers to the future:
    If you will be alone on your birthday, let us know now.
    (If you are alone on your birthday, let us know now is a rather strange sentence.)
     
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