If you win the lottery, what will you do?- indicative sentence?

  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    If you are among the lottery winners next week, what will you do?

    This sentence has a similar meaning, but uses a verb which allows us to see the difference between indicative and subjunctive moods. "If you be..." is not possible there. The present indicative "are/win" is being used with future meaning.

    Edit: I may have misunderstood the question.

     
    Last edited:

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Well, it's a question, not a statement of fact, but English uses the same 'mood' (choice of verb forms) for both, so I suppose that makes it an indicative question. It contains a subordinate phrase beginning with 'if', but that doesn't affect the main clause.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I mean if, grammatically, it was expressed in the conditional mood rather than the indicative mood. Call it the subjunctive mood if you prefer.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Well, I think grammatically it is expressed in the conditional mood, except that the verb forms coincide with the indicative, so no big deal really. :)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Come to think of it, since the original is a question, it’s not in the indicative mood anyway, but the interrogative mood.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    English has conditional sentences, but as it has no special verb forms for them, there's no point saying it (or every language) has a conditional mood.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don’t disagree about conditional mood. But sometimes it’s difficult to know what term to use to explain something, especially since so many people seem to consider subjunctive a dirty word.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I agree, ETB and LB. I know that strong arguments can be raised against 'conditional' mood. However, Wiki seems to recognise its existence even though it says it is 'periphrastic'. Whatever the case, I prefer to qualify verbs in conditional sentences as 'conditional mood' as otherwise I have to accept that all type 2 and type 3 conditional sentences are 'subjunctive', which I cannot do. :) In short, 'conditional mood' seems to be a good catch-all term for conditional sentences.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top