if you wouldn't

arturolczykowski

Senior Member
Polish
It would be better if you wouldn't ask for money
It would be better if you didn't ask for money


What is a difference in the meaning? Or is it just informal way of speaking?

artur
 
  • mrbilal87

    Senior Member
    English (NAmE)
    It would be better if you wouldn't ask for money
    It would be better if you didn't ask for money


    What is a difference in the meaning? Or is it just informal way of speaking?

    artur
    To me, both sentences basically have the same meaning and are both correct. I'd be more likely to use the second sentence, but the first sentence sounds more formal.
     

    Cathy Rose

    Senior Member
    United States English
    It would be better if you wouldn't ask for money
    It would be better if you didn't ask for money


    What is a difference in the meaning? Or is it just informal way of speaking?

    artur
    Hi,
    You start both sentences with the conditional past tense (something that MIGHT happen), but you end the second sentence with the simple past tense (if you didn't ask for money) and the first with another conditional past tense (if you wouldn't ask for money). I don't think there is anything ungrammatical about the first, but it is awkward and cumbersome. You're talking about something that might or might not happen as it relates to a second thing that might or might not happen.
     
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