ignore vs take no heed, etc.

Saeedali32

Member
Persian - Iranian
Can ignore be used instead of any of the verbs take no heed, shrug off, brush aside?

We made every effort to help Adam Wilson modify has behaviour but he took no heed to the opportunities offered, so we took this step as a last resort to protect those going into Neath, and hope the court order will lead Mr Wilson to improve his behaviour.
Man banned from Tesco for continually breaking Covid rules

Joe Biden, his aides and his Democratic allies are shrugging off polls showing doubts about his age and leadership as they plot his expected re-election campaign, and point instead to the U.S. president's flinty State of the Union speech to Congress this week as a sign of his political resiliency.
Analysis: Biden team shrugs off polls, targets key voters ahead of 2024 run

Incoming Bank of Japan (BOJ) Deputy Governor Shinichi Uchida on Tuesday brushed aside the chance of an immediate overhaul of ultra-loose monetary policy, suggesting that any review of its policy framework could take about a year.
Incoming BOJ deputy head brushes aside near-term tweak to easy policy
 
  • Ignore is not a good fit with any of those. It means to deiberately take no notice of something or someone, to make a point of paying it or them no attention.
     
    Short answer: No.:)
    The short answer does not cure my pain.

    Can you explain exactly what changes in the meaning that the reader perceives in each sentence?

    In the definition of both verbs brush aside and shrug off in Merriam-Webster, ignore is used exactly and in synonyms, ignore is the best and first synonym of these two verbs.

    Thesaurus results for BRUSH ASIDE

    Thesaurus results for SHRUG OFF

    Ignore is not a good fit with any of those. It means to deiberately take no notice of something or someone, to make a point of paying it or them no attention.
    Can you explain exactly what changes in the meaning that the reader perceives in each sentence?

    In the definition of both verbs brush aside and shrug off in Merriam-Webster, ignore is used exactly and in synonyms, ignore is the best and first synonym of these two verbs.

    Thesaurus results for BRUSH ASIDE

    Thesaurus results for SHRUG OFF
     
    The short answer does not cure my pain.

    Can you explain exactly what changes in the meaning that the reader perceives in each sentence?

    In the definition of both verbs brush aside and shrug off in Merriam-Webster, ignore is used exactly and in synonyms, ignore is the best and first synonym of these two verbs.

    Thesaurus results for BRUSH ASIDE

    Thesaurus results for SHRUG OFF
    Perhaps your pain is self-inflicted :D
    That seems to be a limitation of the dictionaries and their ability to define one word using other words. This kind of issue is am major reason this site was created. We've discussed the utility (or misleading nature) of "synonyms" in other similar threads. It's rare that we can simply change a word and retain all the original meaning. If you like, "ignore" is a vaguer substitute (and part of the Venn diagrams for the other words) but the other words are nuances of HOW something/someone is "ignored".

    took no heed sounds strange to my ears but means "did not take advantage of"
    shrugging off has the nuance of "assigning little importance to"
    brush aside has the nuance of "deciding not to discuss"
     
    Can you explain exactly what changes in the meaning that the reader perceives in each sentence?

    In the definition of both verbs brush aside and shrug off in Merriam-Webster, ignore is used exactly and in synonyms, ignore is the best and first synonym of these two verbs.

    Thesaurus results for BRUSH ASIDE

    Thesaurus results for SHRUG OFF
    They’re not synonyms at all. So in effect, you’re asking us to explain why you’ve made a false assumption. Neither of those expressions mean ignore, which is anyway something you normally do over time. Brushing something aside or shrugging something off (figuratively, in both cases) is a single short action.
     
    They’re not synonyms at all. So in effect, you’re asking us to explain why you’ve made a false assumption. Neither of those expressions mean ignore, which is anyway something you normally do over time. Brushing something aside or shrugging something off (figuratively, in both cases) is a single short action.
    Thank you, this was a really good and insightful answer.
     
    Perhaps your pain is self-inflicted :D
    That seems to be a limitation of the dictionaries and their ability to define one word using other words. This kind of issue is am major reason this site was created. We've discussed the utility (or misleading nature) of "synonyms" in other similar threads.
    I understood exactly the reason for creating this site and that's why I keep asking my questions in the "English Only" section. The reason why you see that I keep insisting on my words in spite of your answers is that I am writing a book for Persian speakers that will distinguish well the connotation of synonymous verbs in the English language or the verbs that have a similar translation in Persian language. This can only be done by someone Persian native, and an English native cannot do such a thing, and because I am looking for exact Persian equivalents for these verbs, it often happens that I insist on my own words until get appropriate information from different answers to reach the final result.

    Now, let me explain to you my exact understanding of the two verbs Brush aside and Shrug off for you to judge:

    Brush aside conveys the idea that the subject supposes that the object is not that important even though it may be really important or vice versa.

    Shrug off conveys the concept that the subject in his mind judges the object in such a way that the object cannot do any special thing and does not have the ability to create a problem, and for this reason, he does his work as before and continues.
     
    I am writing a book for Persian speakers that will distinguish well the connotation of synonymous verbs in the English language or the verbs that have a similar translation in Persian language.
    Thank you - we now have helpful context for your questions. I fear you use the word "exact" a bit too frequently and that "exact" equivalents will behard to come by:) In any case, you must take into account the precise context for each instance of a given verb.

    For example, my example nuances are not "exactly" in line with your attempts.

    shrugging off has the nuance of "assigning little importance to"
    brush aside has the nuance of "deciding not to discuss"
     
    shrugging off has the nuance of "assigning little importance to"
    brush aside has the nuance of "deciding not to discuss"
    :thumbsup:

    Both of these are often used in relation to someone giving public responses to claims or questions. If you are asked a question and you shrug it off, it means you give some kind of answer that minimizes the importance of what was asked or even implies that it's a mistaken question.

    If you brush it off, it suggests maybe you are even a bit impolite in dismissing it as not even worth answering. You just move on to the next topic.

    In neither case are you actually ignoring it, which usually refers to acting like something doesn't even exist. You can ignore something when you are alone in a room but with an audience of people asking questions, for instance journalists questioning you as a politician, you can't simply ignore the questions. You can, however, shrug them off and brush them off.
     
    Back
    Top