Il banana in pensione

Panpan

Senior Member
England, English
Good morning all

I am completely baffled by the ALTAN Cartoon on the front page of la Republica Friday April 29th.

It shows two elderly men sitting on a bench. One says;
"Per me il banana in pensione non ci va" The other replies
"Piantala col disfattismo".

'In pensione' means retirement, I think.
'non ci va' I would guess means something like 'dosn't work' or 'is no good'.
'Piantala col disfattismo' I would guess might mean something like 'add it to the greivances' (literally: 'plant it with the dissatisfactions').

Please would someone kindly explain

Many thanks

Panpan
 
  • winnie

    Senior Member
    italy, italian
    Panpan said:
    Good morning all


    'In pensione' means retirement, I think.
    'non ci va' I would guess means something like 'dosn't work' or 'is no good'.
    'Piantala col disfattismo' I would guess might mean something like 'add it to the greivances' (literally: 'plant it with the dissatisfactions').

    Please would someone kindly explain

    Many thanks

    Panpan
    disfattismo = attitude to pessimism and strong critic towards what the Country and Government are completing, especially in the moments in which they are engaging in one important and decisive effort.

    non ci va = he does not have the faculty = he won't be able to retire (stop working)

    HTH
     

    Panpan

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Thanks Winnie, but the reference to banana? Is he refering to something like a slippery problem? Sorry, but I still don't get it.

    Thanks

    Panpan
     

    ikester

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    Panpan said:
    Thanks Winnie, but the reference to banana? Is he refering to something like a slippery problem? Sorry, but I still don't get it.

    Thanks

    Panpan
    Hint: banana is a feminine noun, but the character in the cartoon says il banana... ;)

    Also, piantala (literally, plant it) is used to mean stop it or knock it off. So, "Piantala col disfattismo" could be translated as "Enough already of your grievances!"

    ciao :D
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Panpan said:
    Thanks Winnie, but the reference to banana?
    Panpan, it's difficult to get a joke referring to a drawing/cartoon without seeing it. I suppose you're talking of a vignetta, in that case the drawing is usually more important than words.
     

    Panpan

    Senior Member
    England, English
    The drawing is just of two elderly men sitting on a bench.

    So as I understand it, he's saying that he feels he is 'being cheated' by changes in pensions, which will prevent him from retiring. The other is saying 'don't complain all your life' or similar.

    Thanks for your help

    Panpan
     

    Manuela

    Senior Member
    Italy -Italian/English
    Panpan said:
    Good morning all

    I am completely baffled by the ALTAN Cartoon on the front page of la Republica Friday April 29th.

    It shows two elderly men sitting on a bench. One says;
    "Per me il banana in pensione non ci va" The other replies
    "Piantala col disfattismo".
    I'm assuming Banana is a nick name for someone:
    "I don't think Banana is going to retire"
    " stop being so pessimistic"

    I know as it is it doesn't seem funny but at times these cartoons continue from week to week (like a soap-opera) so maybe it refers to something that happened last time
     

    walnut

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Altan refers to Mr Berlusconi... :D "il Banana" comes from "la repubblica delle banane" = Banana Republic. When Mr Berlusconi - a businessman which pedigree was not so immaculate - was first elected, it was quite common to read on the newspapers about the sensation Italy was transforming into a "Repubblica delle Banane" .

    Quoting Altan (in: Banane, Einaudi, 2003)
    "Visto? Non siamo una repubblica delle banane!"
    "No: siamo la repubblica del cavalier Silvio Banana."

    HTH :) Walnut
     

    morgana

    Senior Member
    Allright! Now it makes sense!
    It surely refers to the recent fall of the government, and I read it this way:

    "I don't think we will get rid of him"
    "Stop being so pessimistic"

    There is also a reference to pensions, as he will probably leave us all without one...
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top