il canonico corner personalizzato XXX

tsoapm

Senior Member
English (England)
Hi,
XXX BEER CORNER abbina il canonico corner personalizzato XXX ad una proposta food moderna ed attuale caratterizzata dalla scelta di piatti locali e/o a base di kebab (di carne, pesce o vegetale). – Link (cache)
This “Beer Corner” looks to be a generic sort of “area”, like a snack area, just a branded one. My real problem is canonico: I take it to mean something like “classic”, “typical” or “established”, but I think a literal translation like this would be misleading, wouldn’t it?

I don’t recall seeing any “beer corners” in England before I left, typical or otherwise so I assume I’ll have to expand it out to something like “the XXX-branded version of the established Italian corner format”. Not very snappy, is it? Assuming that I’m right about the format not being typical in the English-speaking world.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
Mark
 
  • Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    I'd say "typical", or even better, "stock"

    Sponsored/branded beer corners usually look all the same: same size, same furniture, same second-rate beer :D
     

    elfa

    Senior Member
    English
    Hi Mark,

    It looks like "beer corner", including branded ones, is actually pretty common, but in other parts of the world other than the UK! I agree it's not something we go in for here, probably because in pubs we don't need a corner to drink it!

    How about ""proverbial" for canonico?

    Something like
    The XXX beer corner combines the proverbial branded snug/area...

    Edit: I've just seen Paul's contribution - maybe canonico isn't meant to convey the sense of irony I had assumed in the original? :)
     
    Last edited:

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Thanks both.

    The problem with "typical" is that it would be read as "traditional": humble Italian peasant folk working all day in the fields and then getting rat-arsed :warn: in their quaintly typical "beer corners" - that sort of nonsense. "Stock" sounds too dismissive and negative unfortunately, whereas the text's trying to sell it.

    "Proverbial" would be a possibility, but I'd have to add the Italian bit in, wouldn't I? 'Cos there's nothing proverbial about it in English as far as I know. As for "snug", it's a very nice word and I'd like to be able to use it, but from what I see, these monstrosities are more or less the anti-snug! :D

    In the meantime, I reworded my idea:

    the established Italian corner format with the XXX brand and (the rest)

    Possibly even longer, but much less awkward.

    P.S. I hope there are some pubs left in England when I'm next back. I've been hearing alarming reports. :(
     

    elfa

    Senior Member
    English
    "Proverbial" would be a possibility, but I'd have to add the Italian bit in, wouldn't I? 'Cos there's nothing proverbial about it in English as far as I know. As for "snug", it's a very nice word and I'd like to be able to use it, but from what I see, these monstrosities are more or less the anti-snug! :D

    P.S. I hope there are some pubs left in England when I'm next back. I've been hearing alarming reports. :(
    No, it isn't proverbial in the UK, but it clearly is in Italy - so that would be OK, wouldn't it?

    There are some pubs left in the UK - but you'd better be quick! :D
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I reckon, in advertising, the less people need to think, the better (for the advertiser). I wouldn't say I disagree with you, but I think it' best to take a different approach. Wouldn't want any "cognitive dissonance" ("What’s a proverbial branded area? Oh, right, maybe they mean in Italy/Europe. I wonder if they have them in America?") to interfere with the relentless march of systematic brainwashing…
     
    Last edited:

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Ah yes. "Now typical" is a rather neat solution; thanks!
    I feel it my sad duty to translate it as "food offer", and I'm afraid I really couldn't say. :rolleyes:

    Edit: Since we’re here, by the way, I have a related question. I’ve often seen the word corner used in the sense of a small display/area for a certain brand within another shop. It’s not really related to this concept (catering area) though, is it?
     
    Last edited:

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Deary me: not the finest advertising copy then!
    You know, some people like how certain words sound or remember that they've heard them used in a similar context so they just throw them any time they have a chance, but that doesn't always imply they know exactly what those words mean!

    Standardised comes to my mind.
     
    Last edited:

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    I have seen the term 'food' used in Italian lately in a contexts that lead me to believe that they don't mean 'food' generically, but rather 'snacks', 'finger food' etc. The kind of food you would eat standing.

    If that's the case, we should find a term in English that convey the same idea.

    The thing is, I am not even sure that that's the case.
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Aaarghhh. I wonder if the people of Italy will ever get tired of complicating my quite-complicated-enough-already-thank-you language. :) In the meantime, happily, "snacks" come under the heading of "food", so I think I'll be letting it pass for the moment. Thanks for the heads up though.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top