il duce's flood

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agustinalucerna

New Member
español
Necesito ayuda con este texto, no tiene sentido para mi, ayuda por favor, gracias

One of il duce's flood protection schemes for us poor southerners except it was built in the wrong place
 
  • Thomas Veil

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    "Un plan de il duce de protectar contra inundación"
    In English, one is much more free to combine nouns without including prepositions between them. So, "flood protection" is understood to mean "protection against flood". Your title seems to have misinterpreted. While it could be parsed as "protection against il duce's flood", it more likely means "il duce's protection against flood".
    Also, "scheme" can mean "ardid", "plan", or "conspiración". More context would help. "il duce" is quite likely a sarcastic comparison to Mussilini.
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Un plan de il duce de protectar contra inundación"
    In English, one is much more free to combine nouns without including prepositions between them. So, "flood protection" is understood to mean "protection against flood". Your title seems to have misinterpreted. While it could be parsed as "protection against il duce's flood", it more likely means "il duce's protection against flood".
    Also, "scheme" can mean "ardid", "plan", or "conspiración". More context would help. "il duce" is quite likely a sarcastic comparison to Mussilini.
    Yo no encuentro protectar en ningún diccionario. Creo que quedaría más claro si escribiéramos Il Duce con mayúsculas, y si no estáis de acuerdo, por lo menos lo pondría en cursiva.
     

    Thomas Veil

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Yeah, I figured that it being of Latin origin, "protect" would be basically the same in Spanish, but I guess it's "proteger". I figured that wasn't the part that had tp OP confused, anyway. I considered putting "il duce" in capitals, but decided to keep it the same as the original.
     

    Thomas Veil

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    If someone's nickname is "Il Duce", is it appropriate to shorten "de Il Duce" to "del Duce"? I'm not clear on the rules for contractions.
     

    Fernita

    Senior Member
    castellano de Argentina.
    If someone's nickname is "Il Duce", is it appropriate to shorten "de Il Duce" to "del Duce"? I'm not clear on the rules for contractions.
    Hi, Thomas Veil!
    In fact, I'd say "... de Il Duce ..." or "... de "Il Duce".
    I wouldn't use a contraction in this specific case because it's his nickname.

    Saludos.
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    In Spanish you keep Duce in Italian, but you usually put in front of it "el", the Spanish article (just as we say "el Führer", instead of "der Führer"). That's the reason why I wrote "del Duce".
    Even so, I believe that a contraction should not be made of de and el when el is part of a proper noun. I was taught that you must say "las calles de El Cairo", for example.
     
    From the Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas:
    "El artículo que antecede normalmente a los sobrenombres o apodos se escribe con minúscula y no forma parte del nombre propio; de ahí que se realice la contracción cuando va precedido de la preposición: Subastaron un cuadro del Greco (y no de El Greco)."
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    From the Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas:
    "El artículo que antecede normalmente a los sobrenombres o apodos se escribe con minúscula y no forma parte del nombre propio; de ahí que se realice la contracción cuando va precedido de la preposición: Subastaron un cuadro del Greco (y no de El Greco)."
    Wow, thanks Kreiner. Good job I wrote "I believe" and "I was taught"! I've just looked at the whole article and see that my mistake was in considering an "apodo" the same thing as a proper noun. I was following the part that says "Cuando el forma parte de un nombre propio y, por consiguiente, se escribe con mayúscula, no se realiza la contracción en la escitura, aunque sí suele hacerse en la lengua oral: Mi nuevo vecino es de El Paso."
    Thanks to you we have cleared up that it should be "del". And if we follow el Greco's example, it looks like there should be a capital letter in "Duce".
     

    Thomas Veil

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Thanks to you we have cleared up that it should be "del". And if we follow el Greco's example, it looks like there should be a capital letter in "Duce".
    Well, it should also be a capital letter in English. So a literal translation would retain the grammatical errors.

    I can only imagine that it does refer to Mussolini if "il duce/Il Duce" is kept in Italian in the original English text.
    No, "Il Duce" can be used in English to suggest that someone has Mussolini-like qualities.
     
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