Il/elle lui en veut

esteban

Senior Member
Colombia Spanish
Hi everyone,

I was wondering how could I translate the expression "il/elle lui en veut" like in the following example.
"Elle lui en veut beaucoup de ne pas lui avoir dit la vérité"
It is usually used in the context "someone has done something bad to you or that you didn't like so you lui en veut". Sometimes even though that person told you she or he was sorry you could still lui en vouloir (if it was really something bad...).

Thanks for your helping.
Correct my English please.
 
  • timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    "To have it in for someone" is a possible translation. "She's really got it in for him not telling her the truth".
     

    esteban

    Senior Member
    Colombia Spanish
    timpeac said:
    "To have it in for someone" is a possible translation. "She's really got it in for him not telling her the truth".
    Merci bien timpeac, it's very similar to French...
     

    fetchezlavache

    Senior Member
    france
    timpeac said:
    "To have it in for someone" is a possible translation. "She's really got it in for him not telling her the truth".

    thanks for teaching me yet another expression timpeac.. is it colloquial ? i'm asking, because 'en vouloir à quelqu'un' isn't.. :eek:


    does 'to resent' work in that case ? i'm still not over my misusing 'imply' over all these years.. :(
     

    Benjy

    Senior Member
    English - English
    fetchezlavache said:
    thanks for teaching me yet another expression timpeac.. is it colloquial ? i'm asking, because 'en vouloir à quelqu'un' isn't.. :eek:


    does 'to resent' work in that case ? i'm still not over my misusing 'imply' over all these years.. :(
    have it in for someone is familier, resent the fact that would be equally acceptable imho
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    fetchezlavache said:
    thanks for teaching me yet another expression timpeac.. is it colloquial ? i'm asking, because 'en vouloir à quelqu'un' isn't.. :eek:


    does 'to resent' work in that case ? i'm still not over my misusing 'imply' over all these years.. :(
    Yes, it's familiar. I thought en vouloir à quelqu'un was too, so thanks for teaching me something too!:)

    Whether "to resent" works or not, I would say, depends on if en vouloir has a certain nuance, and I don't know for sure if it does or not.

    Basically I thought en vouloir had the nuance that you would get your revenge in the future if the opportunity presents itself. "To have it in for someone" suggests that you will go out of your way to do something nasty to "get your own back" if you can, which is why I picked it. "To resent" just means that you don't like someone for some reason. There is no suggestion that you will deliberately do something nasty if you can.

    For example I really resent Tony Blair for taking us to war. However, I don't have it in for him simply because there is no way that I can exact any sort of revenge. Other than not voting for him, I suppose (which I would urge anyone eligible to do - oops sorry, off-topic...)

    So does "en vouloir" have that nuance of wanting revenge? If so I would say "to resent" doesn't work and I will try to think of a non-familiar "to have it in for". If not then it's fine. A toi de nous le dire alors!!;)

    EDIT - just read down as far as JMC's post. "To bear a grudge" would be a good non-familiar alternative, I'd say, since if you bear someone a grudge you would definitely get your own back if you could. END EDIT.
     

    fetchezlavache

    Senior Member
    france
    i don't think there is an idea of revenge in 'en vouloir à', at least it's not obvious to me, it all depends upon the context i suppose.


    atilf says : http://atilf.atilf.fr/Dendien/scripts/tlfiv5/visusel.exe?32;s=2724060705;r=2;nat=;sol=8;
    B. En vouloir à qqn, à qqc.
    1. S'en prendre à quelqu'un, s'attaquer à quelqu'un. En vouloir à la vie de qqn (Ac. 1835-1935). Il en voulait au genre humain tout entier (HUGO, Misér., t. 1, 1862, p. 458).
    Vieilli, fam. Avoir des prétentions, des vues sur quelqu'un, désirer rencontrer quelqu'un. Il en veut à cette fille (Ac.).
    2. En vouloir à qqn. Éprouver de l'hostilité, du ressentiment, de la rancune à l'égard de quelqu'un. Je lui en veux à mort (VAILLAND, Drôle de jeu, 1945, p. 257).
    [Avec un compl. prép. de cause] En vouloir à qqn de, pour, à cause de qqc. Éprouver du ressentiment contre quelqu'un à cause de quelque chose. En vouloir à qqn d'être méchant. Je ne sais si l'on ne nous en veut pas plus d'un espoir déçu qu'on ne nous sait gré d'une faveur (BALZAC, Lys, 1836, p. 160).

    so maybe 'resent' fits, and also 'begrudge' of course, in case of a revenge. maybe.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    fetchezlavache said:
    i don't think there is an idea of revenge in 'en vouloir à', at least it's not obvious to me, it all depends upon the context i suppose.


    atilf says : http://atilf.atilf.fr/Dendien/scripts/tlfiv5/visusel.exe?32;s=2724060705;r=2;nat=;sol=8;

    so maybe 'resent' fits, and also 'begrudge' of course, in case of a revenge. maybe.
    Resent is fine then. I'm not so sure about "begrudge" though. Careful "to bear a grudge" and "to begrudge" do not mean the same thing. You usually begrudge someone something that you wanted. "I really begrudge him that job because I wanted it and was much more suitable". "I really begrudge buying him a present because he didn't even give me a card for my birthday".

    Can en vouloir mean that too?
     

    fetchezlavache

    Senior Member
    france
    oh i fell into a trap !!! thanks timpeac, i wasn't aware i think, about 'begrudge'. it's like 'being envious' then, sprinkled with reluctance at times... ;)

    and no, it doesn't have that meaning in french...
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    fetchezlavache said:
    oh i fell into a trap !!! thanks timpeac, i wasn't aware i think, about 'begrudge'. it's like 'being envious' then, sprinkled with reluctance at times... ;)

    and no, it doesn't have that meaning in french...
    Well we can't be perfect all the time, or people would resent it;)

    By the way, I have since google quite a few uses of en vouloir and I do think that resent is fine. Indeed, because "to have it in for", as I said, suggests that you will take your revenge at some point if possible "to resent" is better since it can always be used while "to have it in for" can only be used for those times you can get your revenge.

    So there, you can't say people don't admit it when they're wrong.:p
     

    fetchezlavache

    Senior Member
    france
    timpeac said:
    Well we can't be perfect all the time, or people would resent it;)

    By the way, I have since google quite a few uses of en vouloir and I do think that resent is fine. Indeed, because "to have it in for", as I said, suggests that you will take your revenge at some point if possible "to resent" is better since it can always be used while "to have it in for" can only be used for those times you can get your revenge.

    So there, you can't say people don't admit it when they're wrong.:p

    oh you cheeky likkle monkey !!! <pokes timpeac>. now leave me be, and let me go back to watching ricky gervais' stand-up comedy, i have a hard time understanding it, no subtitles grrrr ;) </end of chat mode, the french grouchlady retires for the night, cheerio all !>
     
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