Il ferait beau que j’en fisse de même avec mon patron;

RowanF

Senior Member
American English
Il ferait beau que j’en fisse de même avec mon patron; je sauterais immédiatement.

"je sauterais immédiatement" means he would get fired, right? I'm only guessing from context, I didn't find anything about that when I looked up sauter. My other question is about the usage of beau in this sentence. Is it being used sarcastically? Because usually beau is supposed to mean something good.
 
  • Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    Hi,

    Would you happen to have a few previous sentences for us to be sure about the meaning of sauter ? Without any context, it could mean he'd jump out the window as well. About beau, it doesn't refer to anything good-looking, it's just an expression (like avoir beau + infinitive), and I'm pretty sure it means I would be well-advised to... It's quite formal (especially because of fisse, which is imperfect subjunctive).
     

    RowanF

    Senior Member
    American English
    Sure, here are a few sentences before it:

    “On devient complètement stupide.“ pensa-t-il, "à se lever d’aussi bonne heur. L’homme a besoin de sommeil. Il y a d’autres voyageurs qui vivent comme les femmes de harem. Quand je retourne par example à l’auberge au course de la matinée pour recopier les commandes que j’ai reçues, ces messieurs n’en sont qu’à leur petit déjeuner.
     

    Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    Then yes, I think you got it right. He would get fired if he did what those travellers do. I would be well-advised is probably ironic.
     

    RowanF

    Senior Member
    American English
    Okay thanks. Is using sauter for that common at all? Because I couldn't find it anywhere in the dictionary and it is a fairly old book, maybe it's an older usage?
     
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