ill as a hornet

Kane

Senior Member
French - Canada
Good evening

Sorry but I don't have much context.

Somebody comes back home early form the office ill as a hornet

How can "ill as a hornet" be translated to Spanish. I doubt it is enfermo como un avispón


Thank you
 
  • McAlgo

    Senior Member
    English - USA (East Coast)
    I had never heard that, but I take it as being really mad, blinded by fury.
    Correcto. Me parece que se usa este modismo principalmente en el sur de los EEUU. Nunca lo he dicho por mi región. En cuanto a la traducción, defiero a nuestros amigos nativos.
     

    Mr.Dent

    Senior Member
    English - all over the USA
    Correcto. Me parece que se usa este modismo principalmente en el sur de los EEUU. Nunca lo he dicho por mi región. En cuanto a la traducción, defiero a nuestros amigos nativos.
    I've never heard the expression before, and I've lived in 3 different states of the American south since 1983. "Mad as a hornet" is what people generally say.
     

    Kane

    Senior Member
    French - Canada
    Yes, I have seen mad as a hornet but ill as a hornet never.

    Thank you all very much
     

    McAlgo

    Senior Member
    English - USA (East Coast)
    I agree, I had never heard it either before, but the OP was asking how to translate it because obviously he/she encountered it somewhere. I don't believe a translation has been given for "mad as a hornet" on this forum, so would anyone care to offer a Spanish equivalent?
     

    Mr.Dent

    Senior Member
    English - all over the USA
    I agree, I had never heard it either before, but the OP was asking how to translate it because obviously he/she encountered it somewhere. I don't believe a translation has been given for "mad as a hornet" on this forum, so would anyone care to offer a Spanish equivalent?
    To answer this we need to know what Ill As A Hornet means. I found the following quote with a Google search.

    She's (he's) Ill As A Hornet! Meaning In A Bad Mood, Not Sick.

    Read more: Regional cliches... especially stuff parents say - North Carolina (NC) - Page 6 - City-Data Forum
    So maybe tiene mala leche?
     

    Elixabete

    Senior Member
    Basque
    I agree, I had never heard it either before, but the OP was asking how to translate it because obviously he/she encountered it somewhere. I don't believe a translation has been given for "mad as a hornet" on this forum, so would anyone care to offer a Spanish equivalent?
    I did in # 4 assuming " ill as a hornet" meant the same as " mad as a hornet", that is, very angry.
    To those you can add " estar de (muy) malas pulgas"
     

    McAlgo

    Senior Member
    English - USA (East Coast)
    I did in # 4 assuming " ill as a hornet" meant the same as " mad as a hornet", that is, very angry.
    To those you can add " estar de (muy) malas pulgas"
    :oops: Whoops...you absolutely did, and they seem like perfect suggestions. Thanks, Elixabete.
     

    Garoubet

    Senior Member
    French - France, Quebec
    Kane, it's up to you to consider it's the same meaning as "mad as a hornet", but for future readers of this post, I want to emphasize the fact that Mr Dent #10 and myself #8 we both came with a link to North Carolina for this expression with the meaning of "in a bad mood" and not "very angry".
     

    Elixabete

    Senior Member
    Basque
    Kane, it's up to you to consider it's the same meaning as "mad as a hornet", but for future readers of this post, I want to emphasize the fact that Mr Dent #10 and myself #8 we both came with a link to North Carolina for this expression with the meaning of "in a bad mood" and not "very angry".
    I'd say that " in a bad mood" and " very angry" are describing the same type of situation in which most people would say " mad as.." and in North Carolina " ill as...". I don't think they are two distintc expressions but variants of the same one.
     

    Mr.Dent

    Senior Member
    English - all over the USA
    I'd say that " in a bad mood" and " very angry" are describing the same type of situation in which most people would say " mad as.." and in North Carolina " ill as...". I don't think they are two distintc expressions but variants of the same one.

    " In a bad mood" and " very angry" often mean the same thing, but not necessarily. For me the wording of " mad as.." and " ill as..." suggest a possible nuance in meaning. But, I don't know how we will ever find out for sure, unless we have someone on the forum who uses the expression "ill as a hornet".
     
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