I'll <get> you the ticket of the Super Bowl

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park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
I'll get you the ticket of the Super Bowl.
[Source: Reading for Results Ninth Edition by Laraine Flemming]

I'd like to know here what meaning "get" has.
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, PSJ.

    Flemming's sentence looks very odd to me. I'd use this version: I'll get you a ticket to/for the Super Bowl.

    "Get" here mean "buy" or "acquire". Perhaps the speaker intends to buy a ticket for the listener. Perhaps the speaker has a friend who will give him free tickets. Then he will give one to the listener.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    It's nice to meet you.:)
    Thank you, owlman5, for your so very helpful answer.
    2. I'll get you a ticket to the Super Bowl.
    3. I'll get you a ticket for the Super Bowl.

    I think I can interpret #3, but I can't figure out what meaning "to" has in #2.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I agree with owlman. The source seems to possibly contain a mistake, when it comes to obtaining Super Bowl tickets. ;)

    I would use both "to/for" and not of.

    And yes, we take our Super Bowls very seriously here.

    EDIT: Cross-posted.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're very welcome.

    A "ticket to" something is the same as a "ticket for" something, PSJ: a ticket to/for a rock concert = an admission ticket to that rock concert. Using this ticket, a person can go through the gate and see/hear the concert.
     
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