I'll have you know I'm a black belt in karate.

Mustermisstler

Senior Member
Spanish.Spain
Hi everybody,

1) I will have you know that I was here first.
2) I'll have you know I'm a black belt in karate.
3) I'll have you know he is a very nice person.

From the sentences above , I'd like someone to clarify for me whether this "I'll have you know" expression is considered always rude or it depends on the context.

<<Spanish removed by moderator>>

Thanks.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I agree with idilegre and would just mention that I always hear it, and use it, as a contraction: I'll rather than I will. But maybe that's just me.
     

    orlando09

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    It is very emphatic, and usually used when contradicting something someone else has said or giving a warning. It is verging on being rude, but as Idealegre says it depends a bit on context. You wouldn't say it to someone you had a polite and dereferential relationship with, like a boss.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It can be used in response to stereotyping and other forms of rudeness:

    - I didn't think you would know how to sew a button on, because you're a man.
    - I'll have you know I've been sewing buttons back on my clothes since before you were born!
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You could certainly say it to a boss in a joking manner: I'll have you know I'm worth half as much as you're paying me.
     

    orlando09

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I suppose so, but your example sounds a bit weird - who would say that? But, generally, yes, it can be used in a light, jokey manner in some contexts, but that's definitely one to be used carefully. It would all be in the tone of voice etc. I wouldn't recommend it to non-native speakers.
     
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