I'll see you - see you around - take care

charlie2

Senior Member
Hi,
How do we say the above in French?
In English, we don't always "bye" people before we part. "Take care" is another one on top of the above examples. Do you literally translate that into French?
Thank you.
 
  • Markus

    Senior Member
    Canada - English
    I think that "au revoir" would translate well to the meaning you're looking for (I always like translating it literally... at the resight ;)). Whether it's actually used the way that we use "See you", let's wait and see. :)
     

    la rose rouge

    New Member
    United States
    Markus said:
    I think that "au revoir" would translate well to the meaning you're looking for (I always like translating it literally... at the resight ;)). Whether it's actually used the way that we use "See you", let's wait and see. :)
    I agree with Markus, "au revoir" pretty much covers all of your phrases.:)
     

    Caronium

    Member
    Canada - French ~ English
    I've seen "Prends soin de toi" for "Take care"...
    But I personally wouldn't really say it, it doesn't fit well with my vocabulary. ;)
     

    fetchezlavache

    Senior Member
    france
    the translation of 'take care' in 'prends soin de toi' is quite literal, and it is used i think, more and more. i had never heard it in french until a few years ago. i think it comes from more and more american tv shows poorly translated.

    i'll see you can also be translated 'à bientôt', or, more colloquial 'à la prochaine'...
     

    scandalously in love

    Senior Member
    Canada - English
    what about "Attention à toi" (or "Fais attention à toi") for take care...?? I've had that said to me on more than one occasion...
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    scandalously in love said:
    what about "Attention à toi" (or "Fais attention à toi") for take care...?? I've had that said to me on more than one occasion...
    Hi SIL, :)
    I've said it and heard it (in the fais attention à toi version, or even fais gaffe à toi (more colloquial, mean the same).
    I hasten to say I never watch television!
     

    Duo Maxwell

    Member
    France, French
    "à un de ces quatre" for more familiar, but the same meaning that "à un de ces jours"...

    For not-French ones, pronounce it : "à un tsé quatre !" lol ;)

    Or say "à plus".

    More formal : "à une prochaine fois" or "au plaisir"

    Hoping, I could help,
    "à un de ces quatre" :D
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    I would see a slight difference of usage in "fais attention à toi" and "take care".
    egueule said:
    I've said it and heard it
    [...]
    I would say the same: "I have said it and heard it".
    But I couldn't say "I say it and hear it". I mean the English speakers use "take care" on a regular basis, almost each time they part, actually.
    When I say "fais attention à toi", it means I have reasons to fear something for the person. For example :
    - Fais attention à toi, il y a beaucoup d'accidents en ce moment.
    - Fais gaffe à toi, j'ai aperçu les flics au coin de la rue.;)


    At least, this is the way I use this kind of expressions. But there may be other French speakers who use them the same way it's used in English.
     

    Jabote

    Senior Member
    French from France
    LV4-26 said:
    I would see a slight difference of usage in "fais attention à toi" and "take care".

    I would say the same: "I have said it and heard it".
    But I couldn't say "I say it and hear it". I mean the English speakers use "take care" on a regular basis, almost each time they part, actually.
    When I say "fais attention à toi", it means I have reasons to fear something for the person. For example :
    - Fais attention à toi, il y a beaucoup d'accidents en ce moment.
    - Fais gaffe à toi, j'ai aperçu les flics au coin de la rue.;)


    At least, this is the way I use this kind of expressions. But there may be other French speakers who use them the same way it's used in English.
    I fully agree with lv. And I use "prends soin de toi" when I know the person is ill or sad. The rest of the time, I just say au-revoir
     

    fetchezlavache

    Senior Member
    france
    exactly. i agree with lv2426 and jabote, and i thank them for making my most about french persons not using 'prends soin de toi' more elaborate and explicit. i would never use it as a means to say goodbye.
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    When I say "fais attention à toi", it means I have reasons to fear something for the person. For example :
    - Fais attention à toi, il y a beaucoup d'accidents en ce moment.
    - Fais gaffe à toi, j'ai aperçu les flics au coin de la rue.
    My friends lead dangerous lives lol!
     
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