illocutionary act [the intention of the hearer]

SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
11.3
Utterances of sentences are SPEECH ACTS, ie acts of verbal behaviour (spoken or written). When a person performs a speech act, that person at one and the same time utters a particular utterance, namely a LOCUTIONARY ACT. We use ILLOCUTIONARY ACT to refer to a speech act identified with reference to the communication intention of the hearer. The intended effect of an illocutionary act is its ILLOCUTIONARY FORCE.
(A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language; R. Quirk)

Would you be so kind as to tell me whether there is a remote possibility that it should be 'the speaker'?

Thanks.
 
  • duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Could it be: ... with reference to the communication intention to the hearer? (weird, but possible).
     

    Susan Y

    Senior Member
    British English
    Could it be: ... with reference to the communication intention to the hearer? (weird, but possible).
    It could perhaps be:

    .. with reference to the communication of intention to the hearer.

    This makes sense because the "effect" referred to in the following sentence is the effect of the speaker's illocutionary act on the hearer - for example, in the classic example of illocution, "Can you reach the salt?", the intended effect on the hearer is to cause the hearer to pass the salt to the speaker.
     
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