Ils ne se sont plus quittés

Diddlina

Senior Member
Iceland, Icelandic
Hi,

I'm reading this text about a couple who met before the war, then went their seperate ways but later found one another.


they have just met and then it says:

Pendant une semaine, ils ne se sont plus quittés. Huit jours plus tard, Denise est rentée dans sa famille en France.

What I'm wondering is what the underlined text means. Could it be something like: and for a week the didn't stop seeing each other?

thank you.
 
  • lpfr

    Senior Member
    France, french
    Yes, you and giannid are right. But I would have written "ils ne se sont pas quittés" instead "ils ne se sont plus quittés". As giannid said, this last phrase means "never more".
     

    jierbe31

    Senior Member
    French from France
    Yes, you and giannid are right. But I would have written "ils ne se sont pas quittés" instead "ils ne se sont plus quittés". As giannid said, this last phrase means "never more".
    I'm afraid I disagree with your interpretation.
    "Ils ne sont plus quittés" just insists on the fact that, during the whole week, they spent every minute together. That's all.:)
    Please, "rendons à César ce qui lui appartient".;)
     

    lpfr

    Senior Member
    France, french
    I'm afraid I disagree with your interpretation.
    "Ils ne sont plus quittés" just insists on the fact that, during the whole week, they spent every minute together. That's all.:)
    Please, "rendons à César ce qui lui appartient".;)
    It doesn't matter, you are wrong.
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    It doesn't matter, you are wrong.
    That's rather rude.

    Pas or plus would depend on the comings and goings of these two personages previous to the week described in this sentence. As we do not know if they have left one anothers' side previous, we don't know which is correct.
     

    Moon Palace

    Senior Member
    French
    May I add what I hope will be a clarifying comment?
    I believe that both 'ils ne se sont plus quittés' and 'ils ne se sont pas quittés' mean that they didn't leave each other's side, but the only difference between the two French sentences lies with the previous sentences, what happened before this sentence. Because 'ils ne se sont pas quittés' merely describes the present situation, regardless of what happened before, whereas the second 'ils ne se sont plus quittés' while describing the current situation, establishes a contrast with what was the case before.
    Hope it helps:)
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    Wow, thanks Moon Palace, I can't believe I made the same stupid mistake twice!

    left each other's side
    left one another's side
     

    Moon Palace

    Senior Member
    French
    At least then my post will have been useful because you said exactly what I was saying, but much faster than I did.
    And I agree with you about rude comments that ought not to be written in such a nice forum.
     

    lpfr

    Senior Member
    France, french
    You can said

    "à partir d'un moment donné, ils ne se sont plus quittés"

    or
    "Pendant une période donné ils ne sont pas quittés."
     

    Moon Palace

    Senior Member
    French
    You can said

    "à partir d'un moment donné, ils ne se sont plus quittés"

    or
    "Pendant une période donnée ils ne sont pas quittés."
    Yes indeed you can. Simply because 'ne ... plus' definitely establishes a link with a past situation, in the same way as 'no longer'. 'Pas' remains neutral.
     

    jierbe31

    Senior Member
    French from France
    If I may quote the great Shakespeare, I am afraid this is all much ado about nothing.
    Even though your comments are quite interesting, I would like to point out that Diddlina just underlined a phrase, "ils ne se sont plus quittés", which I believe she/he understood quite clearly.
    So I wonder what all the fuss about "pas" is, since she/he only quoted.
    Unless my ageing eyes played me a nasty trick, I did read "plus" and not "pas".
    Have a very nice day.:D
     

    Moon Palace

    Senior Member
    French
    Sorry for your ageing eyes or your excellent memory :), and forgive me for contradicting you, jierbe, in spite of your quoting our master for the English language, but if I am not wrong, you participated in discussing the 'pas/ plus' controversy ;).
    What is more, I believe the controversy was worth raising since although Diddlina got it right from the start, Giannid's 'they never left each other' could either mean 'not anymore' or simply 'not at all'. So, it was worth clarifying things if not for the one who raised the question at least for the one who hadn't quite seen all the details. This is how we all learn more, isn't it? :p
     

    jierbe31

    Senior Member
    French from France
    Sorry for your ageing eyes or your excellent memory :), and forgive me for contradicting you, jierbe, in spite of your quoting our master for the English language, but if I am not wrong, you participated in discussing the 'pas/ plus' controversy ;).
    What is more, I believe the controversy was worth raising since although Diddlina got it right from the start, Giannid's 'they never left each other' could either mean 'not anymore' or simply 'not at all'. So, it was worth clarifying things if not for the one who raised the question at least for the one who hadn't quite seen all the details. This is how we all learn more, isn't it? :p
    Amen!:D
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    Hi,
    Pendant une semaine, ils ne se sont plus quittés. Huit jours plus tard, Denise est rentée dans sa famille en France.

    What I'm wondering is what the underlined text means. Could it be something like: and for a week the didn't stop seeing each other?

    They were inseparable for a week. Eight days later Denise went back to her family in France.
     
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