"I'm a doctor and proud of it" or "I'm a doctor and am proud of it"?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by wistful, Jan 15, 2007.

  1. wistful New Member

    USA, English
    Which one is grammatically correct--"I'm a doctor and proud of it" or "I'm a doctor and am proud of it"?
     
  2. Old Novice

    Old Novice Senior Member

    Massachusetts
    USA, English
    The former is what you'd always hear. I'm not sure the latter is ungrammatical, but it is certainly odd. :) Try it with another verb, for example:

    "I ran the 100 yard dash and the quarter mile."

    versus

    "I ran the 100 yard dash and ran :confused: the quarter mile."

    I think if you repeat the verb, you need to repeat the subject, too. But I could be wrong.
     
  3. Dimcl Senior Member

    British Columbia, Canada
    Canadian English
    Actually, I'd go with the second sentence... "... and am proud of it". What if I'm not just proud... what if I'm very, extremely, deeply proud - then the sentence would read:

    "I'm a doctor and very, extremely, deeply proud of it"

    OR

    "I'm a doctor and am very, extremely, deeply proud of it"
     
  4. roxcyn

    roxcyn Senior Member

    USA
    American English [AmE]
    I think both sound good. Sometimes in AE, the subject is deleted. Sometimes in Carribbean English there is a deletion of the subject, which I don't think happens in AE or BE. These are people who are natives of English. I will give you examples:

    A) How're you doing?
    B) Am wonderful.

    A) What are you doing?
    B) Am working on some homework.
     
  5. cheshire

    cheshire Senior Member

    اليابان
    Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
    Hi wistful, can I ask you to edit and make this a poll, whether the second sentenc is odd or not?
     

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