I'm a shilling up

etepluie

Member
korean
Hello,

In this novel(Eye of the Needle), they are playing blackjack. And then the following sentences :

Slim dealt another hand. Smith won this time, but everyone else lost. "I'am a shilling up," Slim said. "I think I'll retire to that nice little cottage in Deveon. We can't catch him, of course."

I would like to hear your opinions about what the underlined expression means in this context.

Thanks in advance.
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    I've heard "I'm five dollars up" or "I'm fifty dollars down" or something similar when playing poker or blackjack. It has the same meaning: "up" means that you have that much more than when you started and "down" means you have that much less. I think the only difference is the currency involved. :)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I've heard "I'm five dollars up" or "I'm fifty dollars down" or something similar when playing poker or blackjack. It has the same meaning: "up" means that you have that much more than when you started and "down" means you have that much less. I think the only difference is the currency involved. :)
    I took "a shilling up" to be a verbal phrase, like a "a hankerin' for" is.

    If it is just currency we are talking about I have nothing to add.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    It's just currency, Mr P;)
    Upon re-reading I think that is correct. I was thinking of "shill", which has long standing in card playing parlance.

    This from Farlex on-line

    shill (sh
    l) Slang
    n. One who poses as a satisfied customer or an enthusiastic gambler to dupe bystanders into participating in a swindle.

    v. shilled, shill·ing, shills
    v.intr. To act as a shill.

    v.tr. 1. To act as a shill for (a deceitful enterprise).
    2. To lure (a person) into a swindle.
     
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