I'm afraid that it has come at all

timbam

Member
italiano
Dear everyone,

I've got some difficulties with this sentence:

I'm afraid that it has come at all

I really can not understand the meaning of "at all" in this affirmative sentence.
May it mean something like "forever"? Like "it has come to stay forever"?
"E' venuto per rimanere" in italiano?

Thank you very much.
have a nice day!
 
  • AlabamaBoy

    Senior Member
    American English
    It does not sound correct to me.

    Perhaps the author wishes to say: I'm am afraid that it has even come (at all.)

    It still sounds a little awkward, so rather than guessing, could you give more context?
     

    timbam

    Member
    italiano
    yes, thanks. here I am for more context.
    I explain you what the situation is:
    There is an insect who lights on the shoulder of a woman. She interpretates it as a divin sign.
    So, the two sentences are:

    The real awe is how personal it is. The awe is that the bee has come at all.

    (I had modified it a little before, but that's the version)

    I could guess it means what you say, in a "poetic" way, maybe?
     

    AlabamaBoy

    Senior Member
    American English
    I have heard this idiom in the declarative.

    This makes sense.

    The awe is that the bee has come at all. I am amazed that the bee has even come. Meaning that I am not only amazed the bee lit on my shoulder. I am amazed just that the bee has come.

    Che l'ape è anche venuta mi stupisce.
     
    Last edited:

    timbam

    Member
    italiano
    thank you both, really..
    in which sense would you use "mica"? I say it because maybe I can help you with the sense in italian. : ) otherways, thank you again. that's all folks.
     

    timbam

    Member
    italiano
    well, in this case it is not correct like this. the meaning of "mica" is another meaning of "at all". For example:

    The husband didn't come back at all - > Il marito non è mica tornato.
    Claudia didn't make her homework at all - > Claudia non ha mica fatto i compiti.

    You can also use "per niente" for "mica". "mica" is more jergal, I'd say.
    Ciao!
     
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