I'm certainly not giving you any pressure about the job, I'm just asking.

Tenacious Learner

Senior Member
Spanish
Hello teachers,
If I ask someone about a job they were supposed to be done by now, but they haven't done it yet and I really want to be very polite, will this sentence work?
Please, I'm certainly not giving you any pressure about the job, I'm just asking.

Thanks in advance.
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    If I ask someone about a job they were supposed to have done by now, but they haven't done it yet and I really want to be very polite, will this sentence work?
    Please, I'm certainly not giving you any pressure about the job, I'm just asking.
    Well, it's grammatical, and it's certainly polite.

    I think that if you're that person's boss or client, it's probably overly gentle, but that ceases to be a language question.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I wonder about the level of servility here. It doesn't soudn quite right to me.

    I would aim for a neutral fact-finding thing here "How are you getting on with the job? or Where are you up to? Or even, What do you need to help you finish the job?
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I wonder about the level of servility here. It doesn't soudn quite right to me.

    I would aim for a neutral fact-finding thing here "How are you getting on with the job? or Where are you up to? Or even, What do you need to help you finish the job?
    Hello suzi br,
    I appreciate your 'neutral fact-finding thing here'. Though I really want to be very polite here. The person is really helping with some matters.

    TL
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Ah, then you're not a boss or a customer; this person is doing you a favor. Then, yes, I understand what I called overly gentle and Suzi labels "servility". (It does sound a bit servile, frankly.) It's a delicate situation.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Ah, then you're not a boss or a customer; this person is doing you a favor. Then, yes, I understand what I called overly gentle and Suzi labels "servility". (It does sound a bit servile, frankly.) It's a delicate situation.
    Hello Parla,
    Thank you very much for your comments and help.

    TL
     
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