I'm embarrassed by/with you

candycane176

New Member
spanish
I feel like"at" and "by" are interchangeable before nouns or pronouns like I'm embarrassed by/at them.
And "about" is used before verbs, but I'm not sure.
And how about "with", if you say I'm embarrassed with you, does it mean that I'm embarrassd around the person because I did something that made me feel that way in front of them or because they did something embarrassing and I now feel ashamed for them?
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "I'm embarrassed with you" would mean "you and I are both embarrassed (by something)," which probably isn't what you want to say. "Around," "about," "by," and even "for" are possible, depending on the context. "At" seems less likely, but see:

    embarrassed about/at/by/of
     

    candycane176

    New Member
    spanish
    "I'm embarrassed with you" would mean "you and I are both embarrassed (by something)," which probably isn't what you want to say. "Around," "about," "by," and even "for" are possible, depending on the context. "At" seems less likely, but see:

    embarrassed about/at/by/of
    Thank youu, so it true that "at" and "by" are interchangeable before nouns or pronouns like I'm embarrassed by/at them.
    And "about" sounds better before verbs?
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Thank youu, so it true that "at" and "by" are interchangeable before nouns or pronouns like I'm embarrassed by/at them.
    And "about" sounds better before verbs?

    I wouldn't want to generalize; I think we'd have to look at specific sentences. There are definitely situations where "by" works and "at" doesn't: "I was embarrassed at by my brother in front of my friends."
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    @candycane176, can you please show us a specific sentence you are translating from Spanish? Or, if you don't have one, please show us a sample sentence in English, so we can use your concrete example to explain the concept to you.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    "I'm embarrassed with you" would mean "you and I are both embarrassed (by something)," which probably isn't what you want to say.
    Not necessarily. I can easily imagine someone saying that to mean "you embarrass me." Parallel with "I'm disgusted with you." Granted, that wording is not the most common, but I would not usually interpret it to mean "we are both embarrassed."
     

    candycane176

    New Member
    spanish
    I'm embarrassed by/about/at dancing.

    Which one works best?

    Moderator edit: extra examples deleted. Per forum rule 2, please provide only one (1) context per thread. -fenixpollo
     
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