I'm full

patrickr

Senior Member
canada, english
Moderator note: This thread has had other threads merged into it.

How can I say I'm full after eating. I was told something like "resassier" but I'm not able to find that exact word.

Thanks.
 
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  • geve

    Senior Member
    France, French
    You were probably told "rassasier", as in Je suis rassasié(e). :)
    I would more likely say something like J'ai bien mangé, Je n'ai (vraiment) plus faim, J'ai assez mangé, Je ne peux plus rien avaler.

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    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Geve's suggestions are excellent. Just to add that I had some English friends who said "je suis repu(e)"
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    thank you. je suis plein wouldn't make sense then?

    Definitely not. It just doesn't make sense.

    When an animal is pleine, it means it's pregnant. But it can definitely not be applied to a woman, for whom we use the word "enceinte".

    Otherwise I thought of "j'ai l'estomac bien plein/rempli" but anyway I would go for what Geve said.
     

    Louf

    Senior Member
    Français/Québec; English/USA
    Definitely not. It just doesn't make sense.
    While if you say "je suis pleine" it's even worse. It was mentioned in the thread "embarrassing mistakes in a foreign country" but I can't find it anymore :eek:
    When an animal is pleine, it means it's pregnant. But it can definitely not be applied to a woman, for whom we use the word "enceinte".

    Otherwise I thought of "j'ai l'estomac bien plein/rempli" but anyway I would go for what Geve said.

    Au Québec, on entend souvent "Je suis plein" dans le sens de "Je suis repu". C'est familier mais très courant. Les gens de lettres esquisseront un sourire en pensant à l'allusion faite par DearPrudence, mais comprendront, le contexte aidant. Je n'ai jamais entendu cette expression dans le sens de "Je suis ivre".
     

    JerseyRich

    Senior Member
    S'il vous plait.

    I have had a look at the WordReference dictionary for "I am full", and I've also had a look at the dictionary i've got at home.

    What would be the most common choice for saying i'm full? when being asked by the waiter if you would like anything else?

    Would it be one of the choices that Agnes has given someone?

    "je n'ai plus faim" or "je suis rassasié(e)".

    or would one of the following from my dictionary work

    je n'en peux plus or j'ai trop mange


    Merci d'avance

    Richard
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    It happens to me often & naturally I would say:
    "J'ai p'us faim" so I would say "Je n'ai plus faim"
    "Je suis rassasié(e)" sounds a bit too stilted I would say.
    But the suggestions given by your dictionary are good too.
    Take your pick :)
     

    Petronille

    Senior Member
    France French
    All these suggestions work fine all right.
    As far as I'm concerned, when I am at the end of a meal and have eaten too much, I say "je n'en peux plus" or "je n'ai plus faim".
    They're the simplest and clearest ones for the others to understand your state... or at least your belly's!! :p

    PS: To a waiter, no, you just say "ça va, merci/je vous remercie".
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Not what comes naturally to me.
    "Chéri, tu veux encore de la blanquette ?"
    "Non, merci, mais je suis rassasié"

    Mouais, en tout cas, je ne me vois pas tellement dire ça à la famille ou des amis ... Mais c'est très personnel je suppose.
     
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    orlando09

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    PS: To a waiter, no, you just say "ça va, merci/je vous remercie".

    That sounds reasonable. I'm not sure I would necessarily tell a waiter I was "full" in English either - i think it's more something you say to your family and friends if they suggest another course etc.

    I agree that to me rasassié or repu sound a bit formal.

    Interesting that French is quite polite about this generally and seems to have no slangy word referring to the feeling of being "full of food" as opposed to just having eaten enough. English could also offer (more slangy and impolite), eg I feel/am stuffed/ I'm bursting etc too.
    Especially considering food and eating are so important in France! (or is it too serious a matter to make light of? ;)) My mum was visiting recently and in a resturant she said to me she was "pleine" and I had to say I didn't think this was good French. At least she was trying though!

    [having said this - I notice the WR dictionary says: plein(avec de la nourriture)adjstuffed (with food) ??]
     

    Petronille

    Senior Member
    France French
    In the French "étiquette", it is considered somehow vulgar to make any reference to your stomach. Even the so common "bon appétit" is "betraying" your social origins.
    But that, obviously, is quite "réservée à une élite" (no matter how this term is/can be discussed).

    Nevertheless, this règle de bonne manière remains, though a bit "altered". Therefore, when a waiter asks you if you want to order something else and you feel like your belt is the worst invention man ever created, you just say "Non merci" or "(non) je vous remercie", without therefore giving further explanation regarding your stomach. After all, he's just asking if you want something else or not. He's not asking for a full report.

    Now, I may have to add one more thing: I'm not old-fashioned!! :D
     

    hamer1970

    Senior Member
    US-English
    One thing I like about France is that I've never had a waiter or waitress ask me if I've had enough. They just ask, "Terminé?"

    I made this mistake too of saying, "Je suis pleine" and everyone laughed and said it refers to pregnant animals. However, a French friend said that more people are adopting the anglicism and use this expression now to mean, "I'm full."
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    It's probably an angliscism but I would say Je suis pleine.
    And so would I, though not in a restaurant. It's either an anglicism, a quebecism, or both. Then again at my age, chances are that people wouldn't misunderstand pleine as pregnant. :eek::p

    [Québec][Familier]Rassasié. Pas d’autre poulet, merci, je suis plein.

    Of course, I might also say... J'ai assez/trop mangé or Je n'ai plus faim (J'ai p'us faim). ;)

    I agree that rassasié(e) and repu(e) are more formal, and not the same register as "I'm full".
     

    Fanay

    Member
    Canada- French
    In Quebec, "Je suis plein(e)" is colloquial, so it's the most used between all the possible translations where I live. "Rassasié(e)/Repus" are rather rare in daily conversations, but they are often used in writting, because they sound more formal.
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    Je réanime ce fil, retrouvé à partir de cet autre fil récemment réanimé aussi : être plein (rassasié)

    Je suis assez d'accord avec ce qui suit, pour ce qui est du registre - voir aussi le post 23 :
    Unless you normally say things in English like: “Wow, that BigMac left me replete” or “More pizza? No, thanks, I’m satiated,” then I’d avoid rassasié and repu during conversations in French.
    D'accord aussi avec ceci :
    Another expression used in Québec when full of food is je suis bourré. It’s the equivalent of “I’m stuffed.”

    Source : je suis plein – OffQc | Québécois French Guide
     
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    joelooc

    Senior Member
    French (Provence)
    To equate "I'm full" I think the basic uneducated southerner would say "c'est bon" which can be understood as "that's good" or "that's enough". How to deal with "bonne manières" when you have none. :)
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    @ joelooc : In the same line of thoughts, a Quebecer might say : c'est beau, to mean that's fine / enough.

    What do you think of this, copied from the article « je suis plein » that I linked to above ? Would you say that Spanish and Italian who literally say I'm full are uneducated ? And if not, why would it be different in French. :confused:

    Does je suis plein come from the English “I am full”? I don’t know. But we should consider these points before rushing to label it an anglicism:
    1. If the Belgians also say it, it’s unlikely to come from English;
    2. Spanish literally says “I am full” (estoy lleno);
    3. Italian also literally says “I am full” (sono pieno).
    That said, if you want to play it safe you say : J'ai assez mangé / j'ai le ventre plein.
     

    joelooc

    Senior Member
    French (Provence)
    Would you say that Spanish and Italian who literally say I'm full are uneducated ?
    Education can only be measured taking into account where you were educated. There's nothing wrong with saying "c'est bon" to decline any more food after an informal meal with mediterranean friends who won't even take notice. But even mediterraneans this side of the sea can't help being surprised when a north african burps or belches after a meal as a sign of satisfaction, because if he didn't it would be taken as an insult where he was brought up.
    By the way "chui bourré" in French means "I'm pissed" (which is pretty hard to admit when you really are) and "j'ai plus de place" which sounds good-natured within the family circle wouldn't be forgiven at a formal dinner with parisian elites. :)
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    N'en jette plus, la cour est pleine. ;)

    Chui bourré = I'm stuffed n'a clairement pas le même sens en français québécois. Ici, se bourrer = se gaver / manger avec excès.
    Si je voulais dire pissed dans le sens (UK) saoul / plein comme une barrique, je dirais beurré.
    FAMILIER – Ivre. Un fêtard complètement beurré.
    I don't think people would say I'm full/stuffed at a formal dinner with elites either.
    That's where they might say replete/satiated.
     
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    Kecha

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Je n'ai jamais entendu "je suis plein" ni pour dire qu'on n'a plus faim, ni pour dire qu'on est saoul (on n'abrège pas "plein comme une barrique").

    Par contre "je suis bourré", en France c'est sur, c'est pour dire qu'on est ivre.

    Je me méfie des jugements sur l'éducation sur ce forum. J'y ai lu récemment qu'il était très impoli de finir son assiette car on sous-entend qu'on en a pas eu assez. Moi on m'a plutôt appris qu'il ne faut pas gâcher la nourriture et qu'on pourrait sous-entendre que ça n'était pas bon. :rolleyes:

    One thing I like about France is that I've never had a waiter or waitress ask me if I've had enough. They just ask, "Terminé?"
    They are not asking if you had enough (they would not refill it anyway), they are asking if you are done eating, if they can take the plate away or not.
     

    joelooc

    Senior Member
    French (Provence)
    Je me méfie des jugements sur l'éducation sur ce forum. J'y ai lu récemment qu'il était très impoli de finir son assiette car on sous-entend qu'on en a pas eu assez. Moi on m'a plutôt appris
    C'est bien ce que j'entendais par " Education can only be measured taking into account where you were educated. " La notion d'éducation est très subjective, il convient cependant de ne pas masquer son rôle "clivant"(yes, je l'ai casé celui-là!) à ceux qui croient encore qu'on peut se comporter selon sa propre éducation dans n'importe quel milieu. Et c'est valable aussi bien pour les "privilégiés" que pour les "sous-privilégiés"(yes! je l'ai placé aussi çui-là)
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    Soyez sans crainte. Je ne dirai pas chu pleine / j'ai pu d'place si j'ai un jour le bonheur (en est-ce un ?) de dîner avec l'élite parisienne. :p

    J'ai extrait ce qui suit du dico de WR. C'est dans le deuxième sens qu'on l'utilise au Québec. Si je me suis bourrée, eh bien au bout du compte... je suis bourrée. :)

    se bourrer v pron familier (se saouler)get drunk vi + adj
    (informal)get sloshed, get hammered, get wasted, get plastered, get smashed vi + adj
    (UK, slang, vulgar)get pissed vi + adj
    Les deux hommes se sont bourrés pour oublier leurs malheurs.
    The two men got drunk to forget their woes.
    se bourrer de [qch] v pron + prép familier (se gaver)stuff yourself with [sth], gorge yourself on [sth] v expr
    gorge on [sth] vi + prep
    L'enfant gourmand s'est bourré de gâteaux et de bonbons juste avant le dîner.
    The voracious child stuffed himself with cakes and sweets jus
     

    itka

    Senior Member
    français
    Steuplaît, Nico, si un jour on a le bonheur de dîner ensemble, je t'en prie, ne me dis pas "chuis pleine" ! Ce serait trop dur pour mes oreilles françaises - et pourtant, je t'assure que je ne fais pas partie de l'élite parisienne, mais ça, tu le sais déjà ! ;):)

    Il y a des choses qu'on peut dire au-delà ou en deça de la grande mare et qui ne passent pas de l'autre côté !
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    Coucou itka. Je t'en fais la promesse solennelle. :) Je ne dirai pas non plus : chuis bourrée. :p
    Mais il y a peu de chances que tu m'entendes dire : je suis repue / rassasiée, qui ne sont pas du même registre que I'm full.

    Par contre, pour ce qui est de l'autre côté de la grande mare, Oddmania semble confirmer que ça passe chez les jeunes, dans cet autre fil : être plein (rassasié)

    Mais, toute éducation à part, je suis étonnée que les traductions littérales en italien et en espagnol (voir post 26) passent dans ces langues - en langage familier, je présume - et que ça ne passe pas en français. :confused:

    Ce serait peut-être l'objet d'un autre fil.
    Au fond, c'est facile de dire : j'ai le ventre plein / je n'ai plus faim / j'ai un peu trop mangé.
     
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    JiPiJou

    Senior Member
    French
    People who were young in the seventies remember a humorous song by Patrick Topaloff jokingly pretending to imitate a prayer of thanks at the end of a good meal :

    J'ai bien mangé, j'ai bien bu
    J'ai la peau du ventre bien tendue
    Merci petit Jésus.
     

    Juju333

    Banned
    French
    "J'en peux plus, je vais exploser" pretty common but very informal (that's also what I almost always say when I'm full) :D

    It's like saying "I'm full, i'm going to explode"
     
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