I'm going to be/will be more positive this year

edita namas

Senior Member
Spanish-Spain
Hi everyone! How are you? I'm afraid I need your help again.. I'm trying to deal with New Year's Resolutions and I've just discovered there are lots of webpages that go with 'will'. So now I feel confused. I was convinced it was 'going to' in this context of resolutions, as we are talking about intentions or plans we have in mind. For example:
- I'm going to be more positive this year; I'm going to do more exercise..
What do you think? Which is more appropriate, going to or will for New Year's Resolutions?:confused:
Thank you very much for your help & happy new year. ;)




o_O:confused:
 
  • gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    - I'm going to be more positive this year; I'm going to do more exercise.
    What do you think? Which is more appropriate, going to or will for New Year's Resolutions?

    Those are perfectly fine, but remember that "will" was originally a noun that meant voluntad, and from that meaning came its use as an auxiliary verb to refer to future actions. Therefore, some people may prefer to use "will" to stress this idea, that is, that what they are saying is not only an expression in the future tense, but is a reflection of their determination to perform the action.

    That said, both forms are correct and sound natural in the context of New Year's resolutions.
     

    edita namas

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    Thank you very much for your messages and sorry for writing so late. I feel confused, I'm afraid.. I've been trying to understand the different ways of expressing the future in English for a long time.. I thought I was having things clear now and I've just find out I was wrong.

    The problem is that I thought that when dealing with intentions or decisions, it was used:
    - Be going to for personal intentions and plans we have already decided before the moment of speaking, e.g. I'm going to buy a new laptop; I'm going to do more exercise (this sounds like a popular resolution, ;)
    - Will for spontaneous decisions, e.g. I'll have the steak (ordering in a restaurant).

    If that was true, then, I feel I'm stuck with the resolutions again, sorry.. I'm afraid I don't understand the reason why resolutions should go with 'will'. I can see the point of 'will' sounding more natural. Also, I can understand gengo's idea, 'will' original meaning 'voluntad'. But I thought this could be solved with all the different ways of expressing the future that the English language has, that, by the way, it has a lot..So I feel terribly sorry about it, but I desperately need an explanation from a grammatical point of view to be able to understand this. I can only think of 'will' as expressing a promise that I make to myself, maybe, something like 'I'll do more exercise this new year, I promise I'll do it'. Since 'will' is used also for offers, promises, etc, it could make sense to me.. Or perhaps I'm just going crazy with this, sorry.. I wish I could understand this some day.. Sorry again and thanks a lot!
    As always, I really appreciate any help with this.
    Thanks a lot in advance :oops:
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm afraid I don't understand the reason why resolutions should go with 'will'.

    I didn't say that. In fact, I would say that "going to" is more common with New Year's resolutions (despite post #2). I was just explaining that we can also use "will" in that context. "I'm going to lose 10 pounds" or "I'm going to quit smoking" would sound very natural.

    At the end of the famous film Gone With the Wind, Scarlett vows "As God is my witness, I will never go hungry again!" (¡A Dios pongo por testigo que jamás volveré a pasar hambre!). In that context, "I am never going to go" is grammatically correct, but would not sound as natural, because "will" stresses the idea of a vow or determination.
     
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