I'm going to do something / I go to do something

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Kael_1994

New Member
Chinese/Hokkien/English
Hi everyone

저는 점심 먹으러 식당에 가요.
I go to eat lunch in cafeteria.
저는 점심 먹으러 식당에 갈 거야요.
I'm going to have lunch in cafeteria.

I just realized that a lot of example sentences I see online that they normally use the first sentence above. But isn't the second one more correct? because isn't it a future action rather than a present or regular action?

Hi

I think what I want to ask is that does "verb+러 가(other verb also?)요" already contains the future meaning in it? like it doesn't need to change to the future tense, and It already means "Going to do something"?
 
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  • Rance

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Couple problems with your question.

    Present tense of "be going to verb" is not "go to verb", but it's simply the "verb" itself.
    For given particular example, it should be, "I eat lunch in cafeteria".
    Also there is no meaning to "go" as in moving to another place in "be going to ~".
    Hence translating "be going to" to future tense of 가다 is wrong.
    Correct translation would be using the future tense of to eat,먹다.

    I am going to have lunch in cafeteria = 저는 식당에서 점심을 먹을 겁니다.

    Or correct English counterpart should be, "I am going to go to cafeteria to have lunch".

    I just realized that a lot of example sentences I see online that they normally use the first sentence above. But isn't the second one more correct? because isn't it a future action rather than a present or regular action?
    Either can be correct depending on the situation.
    If you are currently on the move to cafeteria, you should use the first expression.
    If you are planning to go to cafeteria soon, you should use the latter.

    I think what I want to ask is that does "verb+러 가(other verb also?)요" already contains the future meaning in it? like it doesn't need to change to the future tense, and It already means "Going to do something"?
    As I explained above, go in "be going to ~" has no meaning of 가다, to go.
    That being said, -요 from 가요 can have different meanings.

    For example, 우리 점심 먹어요 can mean either:

    a) We eat lunch. (This is present tense)
    b) Let's eat lunch. (This is still present tense. but it suggests a future which may or may not happen.)

    Does this clarify some of questions?
    If there is anything I was not clear (which happens often >_<), just let me know.
    I will try to do better on what I failed to be clear.
     

    Kael_1994

    New Member
    Chinese/Hokkien/English
    Couple problems with your question.

    Present tense of "be going to verb" is not "go to verb", but it's simply the "verb" itself.
    For given particular example, it should be, "I eat lunch in cafeteria".
    Also there is no meaning to "go" as in moving to another place in "be going to ~".
    Hence translating "be going to" to future tense of 가다 is wrong.
    Correct translation would be using the future tense of to eat,먹다.

    I am going to have lunch in cafeteria = 저는 식당에서 점심을 먹을 겁니다.

    Or correct English counterpart should be, "I am going to go to cafeteria to have lunch".



    Either can be correct depending on the situation.
    If you are currently on the move to cafeteria, you should use the first expression.
    If you are planning to go to cafeteria soon, you should use the latter.



    As I explained above, go in "be going to ~" has no meaning of 가다, to go.
    That being said, -요 from 가요 can have different meanings.

    For example, 우리 점심 먹어요 can mean either:

    a) We eat lunch. (This is present tense)
    b) Let's eat lunch. (This is still present tense. but it suggests a future which may or may not happen.)

    Does this clarify some of questions?
    If there is anything I was not clear (which happens often >_<), just let me know.
    I will try to do better on what I failed to be clear.
    Hi, thank you so much for your answer!

    I made two example conversations below, can you please tell me which one is more likely to be used in Korea?

    Scenario: bumping into someone who you know, and he asks you where are you going.

    1
    A: B 씨는 어디 가요?
    B: 옷 가게에서 티셔츠 사러 가요.

    2
    A:B 씨는 어디 갈 거야요?
    B: 옷 가게에서 티셔츠 사러 갈 거야요.

    in English, normally we use the second one in daily conversation, as you are asking "where are you going" and "I'm going shopping". Both of them are used in future tense in English, but there are some Korean example sentences when I read online in this type of scenarios, they tend to just use the present tense. Because of that, I'm not sure if it already contains similar future meaning in this type of conversations in Korean, so you don't have to make it in the future tense, or they just make those example sentences in present tense so It's easier for people to learn.
     

    Rance

    Senior Member
    Korean
    A:B 씨는 어디 갈 거야요?
    B: 옷 가게에서 티셔츠 사러 갈 거야요.
    갈 거야요 is wrong. You should write 갈 거에요.

    in English, normally we use the second one in daily conversation, as you are asking "where are you going" and "I'm going shopping". Both of them are used in future tense in English, but there are some Korean example sentences when I read online in this type of scenarios, they tend to just use the present tense. Because of that, I'm not sure if it already contains similar future meaning in this type of conversations in Korean, so you don't have to make it in the future tense, or they just make those example sentences in present tense so It's easier for people to learn.
    Present tense should be translated into present tenses, and future tenses should be translated into future tenses. Period.
    The problem you are having seems to be interpreting the tenses of English sentences incorrectly.

    "be going to verb" vs "be going verb+ing" are not the same.

    1) "I am going to shop" means, "I will shop".
    This is future tense. You might be heading somewhere to shop, or you might be already at the shopping mall taking a rest before you start shopping. Here going does not mean to move.

    2) "I am going shopping" means "I am heading toward (some place) to do shopping)".
    This is present progressive tense and you need to move to a place where you can shop. Here going means to move.
     

    Kael_1994

    New Member
    Chinese/Hokkien/English
    갈 거야요 is wrong. You should write 갈 거에요.



    Present tense should be translated into present tenses, and future tenses should be translated into future tenses. Period.
    The problem you are having seems to be interpreting the tenses of English sentences incorrectly.

    "be going to verb" vs "be going verb+ing" are not the same.

    1) "I am going to shop" means, "I will shop".
    This is future tense.

    2) "I am going shopping" means "I am heading toward (some place) to do shopping)".
    This is present progressive tense.
    Hi Thank for for pointing out my mistake there, I thought was 거야요 for some reason lol.

    I think that's exactly what I'm confused about in Korean, because lets say during a conversation when someone asks you "what are you doing later", and you answered "I'm going shopping " here you certainly use it as future tense. because it can mean both future tense and present progressive tense in English, it really depends on the situation. Like if I'm on a phone with you, and I answered "I'm going shopping" then this one is more of present progressive tense, but it still contains a bit of future tense there, because you are not shopping right now, but you are shopping later when you arrive there. (Normally we add later, right now or time to make it more clear) It's just such a versatile form in English.

    I think my question is, during a normal conversation in Korean. in those situations, would you just use I go shopping as 옷 가게에서 티셔츠 사러 가요? to cover all those meanings ? like in my example which you are correct it's actually more of present progressive in that situation. But there's one conversation that I saw online they use "저는 식당에서 점심을 먹으러 가요". rather than "먹으러 가고 있어요" "먹으러 갈 거에요". It just sounds weird when I translate to English. That's why I'm asking, does it work like "going" in English in a very versatile way. Or that conversation is actually not correct and they just make it in present tense, so beginners like me understand the sentence easier?
     

    Rance

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I think that's exactly what I'm confused about in Korean, because lets say during a conversation when someone asks you "what are you doing later", and you answered "I'm going shopping " here you certainly use it as future tense. because it can mean both future tense and present progressive tense in English, it really depends on the situation. Like if I'm on a phone with you, and I answered "I'm going shopping" then this one is more of present progressive tense, but it still contains a bit of future tense there, because you are not shopping right now, but you are shopping later when you arrive there. (Normally we add later, right now or time to make it more clear) It's just such a versatile form in English.
    English is versatile, but you are taking a few things beyond its grammatical limit.
    The tense matching correct answer should be, "I will be going shopping".
    Sure, English speakers will understand no matter what.(Based on other information, they will be able to deduce whether you are currently heading to shop or will be shopping later).
    That doesn't mean you are grammatically right.
    You can go as simple as saying "shopping" to serve same purpose after all.

    I think my question is, during a normal conversation in Korean. in those situations, would you just use I go shopping as 옷 가게에서 티셔츠 사러 가요? to cover all those meanings ? like in my example which you are correct it's actually more of present progressive in that situation. But there's one conversation that I saw online they use "저는 식당에서 점심을 먹으러 가요". rather than "먹으러 가고 있어요" "먹으러 갈 거에요". It just sounds weird when I translate to English. That's why I'm asking, does it work like "going" in English in a very versatile way. Or that conversation is actually not correct and they just make it in present tense, so beginners like me understand the sentence easier?
    Ok, I think I understand what you mean now.
    Let me think a little more, so I can answer you properly.
    Anyhow you would rather say "저는 식당으로 (점심 먹으로) 가요".
    In the meantime, would mind to provide the conversation where you found the sentence?
    More complete the conversation you provide, better it will be.
     
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    Kael_1994

    New Member
    Chinese/Hokkien/English
    Albeit, I did not want to sound rude, but I should stop beating around the bush and be frank with you.
    I can tell your English is not your first language.
    Your main source of misunderstanding rises partly from it.
    English is versatile, but you are taking a few things beyond its grammatical limit.
    The tense matching correct answer should be, "I will be going shopping".
    Sure, English speakers will understand no matter what.(Based on other information, they will be able to deduce whether you are currently heading to shop or will be shopping later).
    That doesn't mean you are grammatically right.
    You can go as simple as saying "shopping" to serve same purpose after all.



    Ok, I think I understand what you mean now.
    Let me think a little more, so I can answer you properly.
    Anyhow you would rather say "저는 식당으로 (점심 먹으로) 가요".
    In the meantime, would mind to provide the conversation where you found the sentence?
    More complete the conversation you provide, better it will be.
    Unit 5: Stage 5 Conversation Review
    This is the conversation that I was talking about.
    Also I'm sorry I have to point out some misunderstandings that you have there. First of all, "I will be going shopping" that is correct that is future progressive tense. "I'm doing something" that can mean both you are doing something right now or later. However in normal daily conversation you won't create confusion by using such phrases, because "I'm doing my homework "right now"" as you will mention "right now" to make it clear you are talking about what you are doing right now, so it's present progressive. "I'm going out with my friends after dinner" this one is future tense. I have to mention this as well, "I will be going shopping later" and "I'm going shopping later" are different, because one is future progressive and one is future tense.
    Therefore, I think you may have misunderstood some of my point there. I have found my answer here Unit 5: Stage 5 Conversation Review.
    When using present progressive tense, there are two important points to remember:

    1)

    Literal translation between Korean present progressive sentences and English present progressive sentences does not always work, especially if you use the present progressive form in English to indicate the future.

    For example, if you say “I’m not going to work tomorrow” in English, you are not talking about the present but the future, so in Korean you can not use the -고 있어요 form.


    2)

    In everyday conversations, sentences that need to be in the present progressive form do not always take the -고 있어요 form. Korean people often just use the plain present tense form even for sentences that take the present progress tense in English.


    Examples

    Instead of saying:

    A: 지금 뭐 하고 있어요? [ ji-geum mwo ha-go i-sseo-yo?] = What are you doing now?
    B: 공부하고 있어요. [gong-bu-ha-go i-sseo-yo] = I am studying.


    many people say:

    A: 지금 뭐 해요? [ ji-geum mwo hae-yo?] = What are you doing now?
    B: 공부해요. [gong-bu-hae-yo] = I am studying.

    That is what I was confused before.
    Also English is my second language true, I mainly speak Mandarin and Hokkien with my family, and English with my friends. I have been in Australia for about over ten years now, and I don't know why you think saying English is not my first language that would offend me. I mean I like learning languages, I have studied French in my High school and Spanish in Uni. I'm always willing to learn if there's something wrong, and I know I'm not the best guy at my grammar. However, I don't think my examples above is incorrect, but I do realize I may have created confusion there, because I should of used 고 있어요 as my example rather than 을 거에요.
    At last, I didn't say "English is versatile", I actually think English is a very strict language. I was only saying the use of "be going to, or be verb+ing" is versatile in most of the daily conversation, because it is able to represent both tense during certain circumstances.

    Anyway, thank you for your time though.
     

    Rance

    Senior Member
    Korean
    저녁 먹으로 가요(Present tense) => I go out for dinner
    저녁 먹으로 가고 있어요(present progressive tense) => I am going out for dinner
    저녁 먹으로 갈 거에요(Future tense) => I am going to go out for dinner/ I will go out for dinner.

    Translation to English sounds awkward for present tense, but the other two sound fine.
    Apparently this has nothing to do with 가다.

    Let me give you a different example.
    A: 뭐하냐?
    B: 밥 먹어.
    VS.
    A: 뭐 하는 중이냐?
    B: 밥 먹는 중이다.

    First is present tense.
    Second is present progressive tense.
    If you translate them, first example will sound wrong in English.
    However in Korean, both are perfectly fine sentences.

    This is partly due to how English handles simple present tense differently from Korean.
    In English, you use simple present tense when you describe "habits, unchanging situations, general truths, and fixed arrangements."
    When describing an action, you must use present progressive tense.
    In other words, translating first example using present tense sounds wrong because it is wrong.
    Both examples need to be translated into present progressive tense.
     

    Kael_1994

    New Member
    Chinese/Hokkien/English
    저녁 먹으로 가요(Present tense) => I go out for dinner
    저녁 먹으로 가고 있어요(present progressive tense) => I am going out for dinner
    저녁 먹으로 갈 거에요(Future tense) => I am going to go out for dinner/ I will go out for dinner.

    Translation to English sounds awkward for present tense, but the other two sound fine.
    Apparently this has nothing to do with 가다.

    Let me give you a different example.
    A: 뭐하냐?
    B: 밥 먹어.
    VS.
    A: 뭐 하는 중이냐?
    B: 밥 먹는 중이다.

    First is present tense.
    Second is present progressive tense.
    If you translate them, first example will sound wrong in English.
    However in Korean, both are perfectly fine sentences.

    This is partly due to how English handles simple present tense differently from Korean.
    In English, you use simple present tense when you describe "habits, unchanging situations, general truths, and fixed arrangements."
    When describing an action, you must use present progressive tense.
    In other words, translating first example using present tense sounds wrong because it is wrong.
    Both examples need to be translated into present progressive tense.
    That is what I was wondering before. I wasn't trying to focus on 가다 tho, but Korean is the first language I learn that has a completely different sentence structure, so I probably may have made my example sentences wrong to create our confusion there. But anyway hope we both have a nice day, and thank you for your answer :)
     
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