I'm going to make sure that you are invited next time.

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Bob8964

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi, here is a sample sentence in Advanced Grammar in Use:

I'm going to make sure that you are(will be) invited next time.

For the sentence above, the book says the present simple is more proper than the future simple in the that-clause. But I wonder how to translate the meaning of "will". Does it mean a promise or the neutral future? Personally, I think the second is more likely, i.e. a neutral meaning. It is used to talk about what will normally happen in the future.

Please kindly give me some comments on it.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    "Will be invited" is a pure passive future. It states a future certainty. It is, as you say, "the neutral future."
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I wonder how to translate the meaning of "will". Does it mean a promise or the neutral future? Personally, I think the second is more likely, i.e. a neutral meaning. It is used to talk about what will normally happen in the future.
    The verb "will" doesn't say normally. It says something is going to happen in the future, just as past tense says something did happen in the past.

    Other parts of the sentence (or paragraph, or conversation) may modify the "will" statement, turning it into a prediction, an expectation, a plan, or a promise. In your example "I promise" makes this a promise: the person promises to attempt to have you invited to the next one. But the may not be able to fulfill their promise.
     
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