I'm home / I'm at home

Donpayin

Senior Member
Spanish - Mexico
He visto I'm home y I'm at home, cuál es el correcto para decir: estoy en casa?, ¿hay alguna diferencia entre ambos?

Gracias.
 
  • jimreilly

    Senior Member
    American English
    Most of the time these two expressions are interchangeable in common spoken American English, although there may be some difference in "correctness" that matters to experts--if there is, I don't know it.

    There is also the use of "at home" with a somewhat different meaning, of "comfortable" or "at ease". Example: "Is she at home on the golf course?" , meaning, is she used to being there and does she know what she's doing there. This is, of course, not the same as "estoy in casa", but you should be aware of it.

    There is also the expression "home free". Example "He is home free", meaning he has reached the goal he was seeking, and has not come to any harm or received any penalty to get there. This expression comes from a game.

    Expressions like "where's he at?", however, are not considered acceptable in standard English, although they are very common (and I do not personally object to them). It is interesting that such an expression is not permitted, because the answer might very well be "he's at home"! But language is not always sensible.
     

    Donpayin

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    Un contexto:

    TWO PEOPLE TALKING BY PHONE.

    A. Where are you? I'm at the concert now.
    B. I'm home.
    A. Ok, you will miss this great event!
    B. No problem, bye.
    A. Bye.

    A. Where are you? I'm at the concert now.
    B. I'm at home.
    A. Ok, you will miss this great event!
    B. No problem, bye.
    A. Bye.

    ¿Cuál es correcto?

    Gracias.
     

    Druid

    Senior Member
    UK
    English, UK
    He visto I'm home y I'm at home, cuál es el correcto para decir: estoy en casa?, ¿hay alguna diferencia entre ambos?

    Gracias.

    From an English point of view, in the context you gave in a later thread, I would say that "I'm at home" is the more usual reply.

    I would only use "I'm home" when you actually arrive home, walk through the front door and shout "I'm home" to other people in the house whom you cannot see. In this instance I'm not sure what you would say in Spanish, but not "estoy en casa" I don't think. Maybe something like "Aqui estoy".

    Does this help?:)
     

    qky

    Member
    Spanish/Spain
    I would only use "I'm home" when you actually arrive home, walk through the front door and shout "I'm home" to other people in the house whom you cannot see. In this instance I'm not sure what you would say in Spanish, but not "estoy en casa" I don't think. Maybe something like "Aqui estoy".

    Does this help?:)

    But actually we do so, usually preceded by time adverb "ya" (already).

    (Ya) estoy en casa.

    Thus:

    Darling/Family/Plumber/Whatsoever ... I'm home (already)!

    means

    Cariño... ¡ya estoy en casa!

    "Aquí estoy" no se usaría normalmente en este contexto, pero sí "Ya estoy aquí", aunque sería menos descriptivo, más general, valdría no sólo para cuando llegas a casa, sino también cuando llegas a la oficina, al teatro, etc.
     

    Donpayin

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    From an English point of view, in the context you gave in a later thread, I would say that "I'm at home" is the more usual reply.

    I would only use "I'm home" when you actually arrive home, walk through the front door and shout "I'm home" to other people in the house whom you cannot see. In this instance I'm not sure what you would say in Spanish, but not "estoy en casa" I don't think. Maybe something like "Aqui estoy".

    Does this help?:)

    En México diriamos: "¡Ya llegué!"
     

    mazbook

    Senior Member
    United States/México, English
    Hola Druid,
    From an English point of view, in the context you gave in a later thread, I would say that "I'm at home" is the more usual reply. The same in the U.S.

    I would only use "I'm home" when you actually arrive home, walk through the front door and shout "I'm home" to other people in the house whom you cannot see. In this instance I'm not sure what you would say in Spanish, but not "estoy en casa" I don't think. Maybe something like "Aqui estoy". Your Spanish isn't correct, but your explanation of the difference between "I'm home." and "I'm at home." is correct for the U.S., also.

    Does this help?:)
    Saludos desde Mazatlán
     

    LnGwStX

    Member
    English, USA
    I was thinking about the two phrases "I'm home" and I'm at home", and I agree, mostly, with the other answers. But I was trying to figure out why the first phrase even exists, if the other one is usually correct. I have some theories. Here are two different examples:

    I'm home for the holidays.

    You can say "I'm at home for the holidays", but it has a slightly different feeling; "I'm home for the holidays" means I'm in my hometown/neighborhood, but not necessarily in my own home. For example, a college student who has moved from his hometown of Boston, MA to Phoenix, AZ for college and currently lives in Phoenix can say he is "home" for the holidays if he stays with his best friend in Boston during the holiday break. He is not in his own home, or his parents' home, either, but is "home" in that he has returned to the area he came from. But if he says "I'm at home for the holidays" it could mean his home in AZ or his parents' home in Boston, but couldn't really include the best friend's place in Boston. You COULD say it, but it wouldn't be as clear or as natural as "I'm home for the holidays".

    I'm home from work.

    As the others mentioned, "I'm home" also is used to show arrival. If you are talking about where you are (and have been for any amount of time), you say "I'm at home". But when you're talking about your arrival, especially if you are talking to someone who is already there, you would say "I'm home". It feels sort of like "I'm home" is advising someone that you have arrived where they are, or where they expect you to be, whereas "at home" is telling someone your location when you could be anywhere.

    Here is a silly story using I'm home and I'm at home in a bunch of different ways, so you can get the feel of it.

    Betty and Bill went home to Colorado over the Christmas break. While they were there, Susan, Betty's co-worker, called Betty on her cell phone to wish her a happy holiday.

    BETTY: Hello?
    SUSAN: Hey, Betty, happy holidays!
    BETTY: Hi, Sue! Nice to hear from you!
    SUSAN: You too. I called your house, but nobody answered, then Ted told me you guys were out of town. Where are you?
    BETTY: I'm home visiting family; Bill's here, too, but Bobby isn't home from school, he stayed in his dorm with his new college friends. Just me an Bill at home with my family.
    SUSAN: Wow, that's fun. Denver, right?
    BETTY: Yeah. It's cold.
    SUSAN: I bet. Does your family have a fireplace to keep everyone warm in the Colorado winter?
    BETTY: Oh, we're not staying with the family -- too many people. We're staying at the Sheraton. Since we're only home for a few days, we figured we might as well splurge on a nice place and save the stress of having so many people in a small house -- almost all the family are home right now. It's just too crowded.
    SUSAN: Wow, I bet. The Sheraton! Whew, I wish I could've stayed at the Sheraton when I went to visit my parents. I had to stay at home, in my old bedroom. Imagine, me and Ted in my old twin bed. THAT was tons of fun.
    BETTY: Ha, I can imagine. Well, with Bill's Christmas bonus, we had just enough to bail us out of the crazy house and spring for the Sheraton.
    SUSAN: Must be nice.
    BETTY: Yeah...hang on, someone's on the other line....(after answering the other call)...Oh, that was Bill, calling to tell me he'll be home soon. Yesterday he wasn't home until almost 11, and I chewed him out for not calling. I guess he doesn't want that to happen again.
    SUSAN: Haha, I can just imagine! Speaking of which, Ted's at home right now waiting for me; I'm shopping for some stuffing. Can you believe he forgot? Anyway, he's expecting me home soon, so I better hurry up. Just wanted to call and wish you happy holidays.
    BETTY: Sure, thanks for calling. It was nice talking to you! See you next week!
    SUSAN: Likewise. Alright, bye!
    BETTY: Bye!
    BILL: (From doorway) Honey, I'm home!
    BETTY: Did you remember the cranberry sauce?
    BILL: Uhhhhhhh.....oops. Sorry.

    So, language is fun and confusing, and the only way to get it, really, is to hear it used properly. I hope my little story helps some. :)
     

    qky

    Member
    Spanish/Spain
    [...]

    I have some theories. Here are two different examples:

    I'm home for the holidays.

    You can say "I'm at home for the holidays", but it has a slightly different feeling; "I'm home for the holidays" means I'm in my hometown/neighborhood, but not necessarily in my own home. For example, a college student who has moved from his hometown of Boston, MA to Phoenix, AZ for college and currently lives in Phoenix can say he is "home" for the holidays if he stays with his best friend in Boston during the holiday break. He is not in his own home, or his parents' home, either, but is "home" in that he has returned to the area he came from. But if he says "I'm at home for the holidays" it could mean his home in AZ or his parents' home in Boston, ...

    [....]

    Sure. You are quite right.

    In Spanish it has also the same meaning.

    Volver con la frente marchita, las nieves del tiempo blanquearon mi sién...
    ... veinte años no son nada...

    One feels comfortable at home even if nothing remains as you remembered it was. :eek:
     

    bwuw

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and Catalan
    So, if we're talking about what we do when we're home, it's better to say

    When I'm at home, I like reading.

    I understand that you wouldn't use "When I'm home, I like reading" as often as the fisrt option.

    Is that correct? Thanks,

    B
     

    Gabriel

    Senior Member
    Argentina / Español
    So, if we're talking about what we do when we're home, it's better to say

    When I'm at home, I like reading.

    I understand that you wouldn't use "When I'm home, I like reading" as often as the fisrt option.

    Is that correct? Thanks,

    B
    And yet...

    When I'm home ev'rything seems to be right
    When I'm home feeling you holding me tight, tight, yeh
     
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