I'm more than welcome to..

Paulfromitaly

MODerator
Italian
Hello,

This is an American lawnmower salesman speaking to a customer:

If there are any problems with the lawnmower, I'm more than welcome to drop by and take a look at it.
The meaning is crystal clear, however I'd have expected "happy" or "willing" rather than "welcome", when " I " is the subject of a sentence.
Is "I am welcome to do something" standard, correct English?

Thank you
 
  • LauraK

    Senior Member
    American English
    It is correct English but I've never heard the phrase used in the first person---you're right, here "willing" or "happy" would be standard. But if you left with the lawnmower and he wanted you to know that you could drop by his shop with any problems, he could say "If there are any problems, you're more than welcome to drop by and I'll take a look at it." See the difference? You're inviting someone to take you up on an offered service, so "you are welcome to" makes sense, whereas "I'm more than welcome" doesn't. Of course you'll hear that in reported speech: "My sister said I was more than welcome to drop by for lunch today, but she wasn't even home at noon." Hope this helps.
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    It is correct English but I've never heard the phrase used in the first person---you're right, here "willing" or "happy" would be standard. But if you left with the lawnmower and he wanted you to know that you could drop by his shop with any problems, he could say "If there are any problems, you're more than welcome to drop by and I'll take a look at it." See the difference? You're inviting someone to take you up on an offered service, so "you are welcome to" makes sense, whereas "I'm more than welcome" doesn't. Of course you'll hear that in reported speech: "My sister said I was more than welcome to drop by for lunch today, but she wasn't even home at noon." Hope this helps.
    Thank you.
    I do know that "You're welcome to.." is perfectly fine, but here the speaker is telling the customer that he (the salesman) is even willing to go to the customer's home and take a look at the lawnmower.
    There are quite a few Google hits for "I'm more than welcome to..":

    I'm more than welcome to invite him again..
    I'm more than welcome to share that knowledge with you..
    I'm more than welcome to give you..
    I'm more than welcome to read critics on my books..
    I'm more than welcome to give him his car back..
     

    ABBA Stanza

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    There are quite a few Google hits for "I'm more than welcome to..":
    So it seems. Furthermore, quite a few of them use welcome in the sense you indicate here (as opposed to perfectly normal constructions like "He told me I'm more than welcome to borrow the car if I want to").

    However, before you pointed it out, I had never seen "welcome" meaning "willing" before, and immediately viewed it as being a straight mistake. I'm still pretty sure it's not valid BE.

    All the best,
    Abba
     

    LauraK

    Senior Member
    American English
    Okay, I see. But on those Google hits I would understand almost all of them as implying reported speech---i.e., "(according to her) I'm more than welcome to invite him again..." in which case it isn't emphasizing that the speaker is willing to do x, but that someone somewhere is willing to have him do x. I could be wrong, I've just never heard it used that way and it doesn't make sense insofar as "welcome" doesn't carry anything like the meaning of "willing," except for "admitted willingly." Maybe it is gradually becoming an alternative way of saying "I'm more than willing/happy to do x." Stranger things have happened.

    Edit: cross-posted with Abba....maybe I'm wrong here! Sorry for confusing things.
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Okay, I see. But on those Google hits I would understand almost all of them as implying reported speech--
    That's a good point: when it's reported speech, I don't have any problem with it.
    This in another example I've just found:
    I am more than welcome to work this out with you, but the fact that you blow this off as "technically impossible" is not the best customer service attitude.
    This is most definitely not reported speech.
     

    LauraK

    Senior Member
    American English
    True. That sounds so weird to me, and possibly is flat out wrong, but people besides your lawnmower salesman apparently use it that way, so...
     
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