I'm not sure if the room is opened

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  • Agró

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Navarre
    - ¿Puedes ir a la habitación y traerme el libro?
    - Sí, pero no estoy seguro de que la habitación esté abierta.

    - Sí, pero no estoy seguro de si la habitación está abierta.

    Shouldn't it be 'open'?
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    I agree with Agró; the original sentence in English appears to be incorrect.
    I'm not sure if the room is open. :tick:
    I'm not sure if the room has been opened. :tick:
    I'm not sure if the room is opened :confused:
     

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    "Open" is an adjective and it describes the "state" of the door, and that makes the sentence self-referential (it means what it means, and doesn't need additional context): I'm not sure the door is open; "is opened" is passive voice, and, without an agent, "processing" the meaning of this passive voice is not always easy; add, an agent, and "meaning" becomes clear: I'm not sure the door is opened by the security guard (signalling habitual action, which in the active form becomes "I'm not sure the security guard opens the door"). Sometimes, there's a pragmatic reason to say "is opened" rather than "has been opened;" When the refrigerator door is opened, the light comes on. In this case, "is opened" suggests an immediate action, meaning that the light comes on as soon as you open the door. This sense of immediate cause-and-effect doesn't quite come across with "has been opened," at least to my non-native ears.
     
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