I'm not welcome <with> my son.

csicska

Senior Member
hungarian
Hello. In the movie Home Alone an elderly citizen is having a conversation with a kid at a church and says "I'm not welcome with my son" to express his situation that his son doesn't want to see him at his house because they had an argument in the past. Does "with" go with "welcome" in that sentence and does it only refer to his son's house or it means that his son doesn't want any contact with him? Thank you.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It could mean several things; it's ambiguous.

    At first sight I thought it meant that he wasn't welcome if he came with his son, but it could have the meaning which you explain it has in the film.
     

    csicska

    Senior Member
    hungarian
    Thank you. Here's the surrounding context if anyone needs it:

    - I came to hear my granddaughter sing, and I can't come and hear her tonight.
    - You have plans?
    - No. I'm not welcome.
    - At church?
    - Oh, you're always welcome at church. I'm not welcome with my son.
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    ... or it means that his son doesn't want any contact with him.
    English isn't my mother tongue, but that's what I personally understand.

    My son doesn't welcome me... anywhere - which of course would include his house.
    Said otherwise : I'm not in good graces with my son.
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    It sounded odd to my non native ears, too. The equivalent in French would sound just as odd.
    I simply wrote what I understood in context.
     
    Last edited:

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'm afraid it doesn't sound odd to me at all. The corpuses have plenty of examples of welcome with + a person or family, eg:

    " No, no. You should do whatever you want. I mean, of course you're welcome with me. It's your house, too."
    The Patron Saint of Liars, Ann Patchett
    But I meant what I said; providing she stops attacking you, she'll always be welcome with us,... The Stolen Heart. Browning, Amanda.

    I don't doubt it would sound odd in French, but I regard it as perfectly natural in English.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    It doesn't sound quite so odd to me in the positive there as it does in the negative.

    But I wouldn't say "I'm not welcome with [someone]" and I share the opinion of those who say it doesn't sound natural. :(
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Perhaps the most common use of the expression, to be not welcome with a person, is the one I mentioned in post #2, one is not welcome when accompanied by the person. Here is an example:

    The lesbian mother may feel she is not welcome with her children at gay social functions Contemporary Perspectives on Psychotherapy with Lesbians and Gay Men edited by Terry S. Stein, Carol J. Cohen

    The use that some people regard as unnatural is common enough too. I can't think how anyone can reject it:

    I was a woman now. Woman! The ultimate outsider. Not welcome with my father and his cronies.
    Deadly Wager: A Kete MacKinnon Murder Mystery, Elaine Hatfield; Richard L. Rapson

    9:00 – Faye Resnick calls Nicole from a drug rehabilitation center. She says Nicole says she told Simpson: “Get away from us! Get out of my life. You’re not welcome with this family anymore.” Based on trial testimony and other reports on June 12, 1994: O.J. Simpson Trial documents.

     
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