I'm on the wait list of 6 people in line.

Appreciated Wang

New Member
Mandarin - China
I'm trying to email my professor about adding a class.

Can I say "I'm on the wait list of 6 people in line."?
or I have to say "I'm on the wait list, and there are 6 people in line."?

I really Appreciate your answer!
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think you mean that you are on the waiting-list (well, you would be in BE). If there are 6 people in front of you - "I'm seventh on the waiting-list."

    What is the attraction of having such a disgusting avatar?
     

    Appreciated Wang

    New Member
    Mandarin - China
    I think you mean that you are on the waiting-list (well, you would be in BE). If there are 6 people in front of you - "I'm seventh on the waiting-list."

    What is the attraction of having such a disgusting avatar?
    I don't know my place on the waiting-list, but I know it's a waiting-list that includes 6 people in total, and I'm one of those 6 people. I'm just wondering about this part:
    I'm on the waiting-list of 6 people in line. Can I use "of" to connect both parts? or I have to use a comma like in the second example?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    "I'm on a waiting-list of 6, but I don't know my position." Adding "people in line" is completely redundant because a waiting-list is a queue (BE) or line (AE), and a waiting-list for a class can only consist of people.

    (Unless you are trying to get your dog into obedience classes :) )
     

    Appreciated Wang

    New Member
    Mandarin - China
    "I'm on a waiting-list of 6, but I don't know my position." Adding "people in line" is completely redundant because a waiting-list is a queue (BE) or line (AE), and a waiting-list for a class can only consist of people.

    (Unless you are trying to get your dog into obedience classes :) )
    Thanks a lot, That's a great answer.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In AE, if there's a waiting list, then there isn't a line. If you put your name on the waiting list, you don't have to stand in a line. The two things serve the same purpose. It's worse than redundant. It would be like talking on the phone with someone while you are chatting online.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I agree with the above. You have to remain consistent.

    There is a waiting list of six names; I'm number X on that list.

    There is a line of six people waiting to see the professor; I'm the Xth on that line.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    In AE, if there's a waiting list, then there isn't a line.
    Well, there is, just as there's a queue in BE. But it's a figurative one. The people on the waiting list are placed in order, just as if they were standing in a queue/line.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I want to make a reservation at a restaurant, but there are no tables available. I'm told, however, that there may be cancellations. Two others called before me, though, and if tables become available, they'll get them. I'm third on the waiting list.

    I'm standing in a line at the theater box office waiting to buy a ticket to see a movie. There are two people standing in front of me. I'm third in line.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Because in BE "line" is not a specific word for a literal "queue", "I'm third in line" can apply to any form of queue - a physical one, or a figurative one (ie, a waiting-list). The waiting-list to be the British monarch does not involve the royals standing in a line in the rain, which is fortunate, since the fourth in line is but a baby and poor old Charles has been waiting a very long time indeed.*

    So, in BE there is no need at all to be consistent. My comment < Adding "people in line" is completely redundant because a waiting-list is a queue > was correct for BE.
    There's nothing at all amiss for me with "There is a waiting list of six names; I'm third in line." although I'd be more likely to say "I'm third in the queue." It wouldn't be wrong to say "There's a huge queue of people waiting to see the Prof. I'm tenth on the list." or ".... tenth on the waiting-list." "There's a huge queue" doesn't have to mean a line of people trailing down the corridor outside his office, it just means there's a lot of people awaiting their turn to see him. Don't you have a figurative use of "line" in the same way in AE?

    * The longer the better, as far as I'm concerned.
     
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