I'm *over at* the Stern School.

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ywf

Senior Member
Mandarin
Hello, forum.

I was reading a transcript when I found the following paragraph:

I'm Mike Uretsky. I'm over at the Stern School of Business. I'm also one of the Co-Directors of the Center for Advanced Technology.

I don't quite get the in-red "over at"; I'm wondering what on earth that could mean. Would someone please explain that to me? Thanks in advance.

Side note: Maybe it's helpful to mention it is a verbatim audio transcript. So there might be a possibility that the speaker originally meant to say one preposition and then suddenly decided to use the other one. This is just my blind guess.
 
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    "Over at" is a common informal phrase. "Over" might be thought to be redundant, and I don't think it conveys a great deal, but it expresses, to me, the fact that the place is at a certain distance from the listener; in another part of town perhaps, but not too far away, and that this place is familiar to the listener.

    Other people may have different interpretations; I think it's a somewhat vague phrase.
     

    ywf

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thank you for your prompt reply, MM.

    I think you get it right, MM! The speech took place in New York University, not the school the speaker mentioned.
     
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