I'm sitting/sat

deivd

New Member
Spanish
Hello everyone. I have a doubt. Why do I say “she is gone” or “i am done” and , however, I have to say “I’m sitting” or “I’m standing” instead of “I’m sat” or “I’m stood”

Thank you
 
  • Esmatic

    New Member
    Spanish
    Hola, en los primeros casos la acción ha terminado, mientras que en los segundos la acción está aconteciendo. Además, la gramática española y la inglesa no son literalmente paralelas. Saludos
     

    Magazine

    Senior Member
    Español-España.
    Hello everyone. I have a doubt. Why do I say “she is gone” or “i am done” and , however, I have to say “I’m sitting” or “I’m standing” instead of “I’m sat” or “I’m stood”

    Thank you
    Bienvenidos al foro, Deivd y Esmatic :)

    Pues mira, hay varias discusiones acerca de este tema en la web. Esta es una :

    Is there any difference between "I'm sat" and "I'm sitting"?

    También hay una larga discusión acerca del tema aquí.

    I am sitting down vs I am sat down

    Mi amigo americano dice "I am sat" todo el rato...así que para él es natural.
     

    Sprache

    Senior Member
    English/inglés
    I would never say 'I am sat' (BrE).
    I've always assumed that it was regional/dialectal but I have certainly heard many British people say things like "I am/was sat" hundreds of times. Never an American, though.

    Bevj, are you saying that you've never heard this usage from any fellow Brits before?
     

    pdxw80

    Member
    English - United States
    I've only encountered the phrase "I'm sat" from a British friend who lives in the Northeast of England, in County Durham to be exact. It's a regional construction.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Why do I say “she is gone” or “I am done”, but I have to say “I’m sitting” or “I’m standing” instead of “I’m sat” or “I’m stood”?
    Why? Well, English is not very consistent in its rules.

    "She is gone" is really just a variation on "she has gone," although that "correct" version would sound unnatural in many situations (at least in AmEn).

    "I am done" is colloquial speech. Strict grammarians will say that it is incorrect, because what is "done" is the object of the verb, not the subject. Therefore, strictly speaking, we should say "(the job, etc.) is done," but it is extremely common to say "I am done," and I don't consider it incorrect at all for casual speech, although I wouldn't use it in writing or in formal speech.

    A similar case is "I am finished," which strictly should be "I have finished," but is so common as to be universally used.

    As for "I am stood," that is more logical, because "to stand" can be either transitive or intransitive, and if you say that you are stood, it means that someone stood you up (= put you in a standing posture).
     
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