I'm sure

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mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
I'm sure she's not at home. I've just phoned and there's no reply.
I say in other way:
"She mustn't be at home."
Is it correct?
Thanks.
 
  • sarcie

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    Hi mimi,

    Yes, both are correct, but they don't quite mean the same thing.

    1. I'm sure she's not at home.
    This means that you know for certain that she's not in her house.

    2. She mustn't be (at) home.
    This means that you assume she is not in her house because you called and there was no answer.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    No, sarcie.
    I want to use the words such as "must" or "can".
    What about this sentence?
    She can't be at home.
     
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