I'm through for the summer

Englishisgreat

Senior Member
German
Dear all,

I have just read the following sentences.

Jack: Do you have school today?
Jane: I'm through for the summer.

What does the expression: I'm through for the summer? mean? Is this expression very common in English?
 
  • reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    To be through for.........to be through with......... = to be finished with
    I'm through with this company
    = I quit (my job at this company).
    etc

    Note:
    I'm not quite sure what Jane's sentence means......doesn't sound right.
    Does it mean she's through (with school) and will begin her summer vacation??
    Or does it mean she's through with summer and will begin school soon,????
    As it stands, that sentence is incorrect.....it actually doesn't mean anything !!
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Yes, "through" is commonly used informally to mean "finished" so I suspect it probably means that Jane has just started her summer holidays (AE = vacation).

    Had I been Jane, I think I'd have said (in BE). "We've just broken up for the summer [holidays]".
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I'm puzzled by Reno's reply. Even British speakers (who would not usually say "Do you have school..." or "I'm through...") will recognise the locution "To be finished for + <time-period>"

    I've finished for the day = my work is complete and I'm having the rest of the day off;
    I've done for the week = my week's work has ended, so I'm free for the rest of the week.

    So we'd understand "I'm through for the summer" to mean "I'm not going to school today because the term has ended and I have the rest of the summer off."

    That's not the same as "to be through with", which means to have broken off relations with or to have no further need of.

    [Cross-posted.]
     

    Englishisgreat

    Senior Member
    German
    Dear all,

    Many thanks for your feedback.

    Jane is finished with school for the summer. She doesn't plan to take any classes during the summer. Instead, she wants to take a break.
     

    reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Yes, "through" is commonly used informally to mean "finished" so I suspect it probably means that Jane has just started her summer holidays (AE = vacation).

    Had I been Jane, I think I'd have said (in BE). "We've just broken up for the summer [holidays]".
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

    There's many ways to "fix" Jane's sentence. In AE a common way to express the idea is to say:

    School's out and we're free for the summer.

    SideBar -
    Note that I used "There's many ways...." instead of the "correct" "There are many ways....." The expression
    "there's" has nearly completely replaced "there are...." in AE. [Note that I used "there's" without even thinking about it.....I did it automatically......this shows how ingrained this expression has become in AE]
     

    reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
    I see no way to arrive at this interpretation.
    :confused: :confused:
    Yes - thanks (to the many) for pointing out that "I'm through for the summer" means I've finished school and am now free "for the summer" to do what I want.

    What happened was that I took the sentence "out of context" ignoring what John had just asked (Do you have school today?).
    If you do that - if you just look at Jane's sentence independent of what John asked, - then my train of thought may be forgiven

    I still contend that if you look at Jane's sentence on its own, it's open to several interpretations......if the listener is unaware that "school" is what's being talked about, Jane's sentence is actually incoherent. (which is why one shouldn't ever ignore context and why it's so necessary).
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    My first thought was different. If I heard that sentence I would assume Jane had been taking extra classes in the summer and that she had now completed those classes. She's now through for the summer. She did have summer classes, which Jack knew and was why he was asking her the question, but now she is finished and has no more school obligations until fall.

    In the U.S., the school year everywhere that I know about finishes well before the official start of summer in the third week of June. Unofficially, summer starts when the school year ends, which is about the time the weather starts getting seriously warm.

    Saying "I'm through for the summer" would be pointless in normal circumstances. It's not summer yet until after you're done and in that sense everybody is through for the summer when the school year ends. But in the case of individual students taking summer classes, it would be a very meaningful sentence. I think where I lived summer school lasted three or four weeks, and the summer was longer than that. "I'm through for the summer" would describe that time after the last summer class but before the start of the new school year.
     
    Last edited:

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Saying "I'm through for the summer" would be pointless in normal circumstances. It's not summer yet until after you're done and in that sense everybody is through for the summer when the school year ends.
    But not everyone's school year ends on the same day, or even in the same week.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    But even so, in those circumstances you're not through for the summer, you're through for the year. You've completed the year. It's equivalent to saying, "I'm done for the year."
     

    ninjasensay

    New Member
    English -America
    My first thought was different. If I heard that sentence I would assume Jane had been taking extra classes in the summer and that she had now completed those classes. She's now through for the summer. She did have summer classes, which Jack knew and was why he was asking her the question, but now she is finished and has no more school obligations until fall.

    In the U.S., the school year everywhere that I know about finishes well before the official start of summer in the third week of June. Unofficially, summer starts when the school year ends, which is about the time the weather starts getting seriously warm.

    Saying "I'm through for the summer" would be pointless in normal circumstances. It's not summer yet until after you're done and in that sense everybody is through for the summer when the school year ends. But in the case of individual students taking summer classes, it would be a very meaningful sentence. I think where I lived summer school lasted three or four weeks, and the summer was longer than that. "I'm through for the summer" would describe that time after the last summer class but before the start of the new school year.
    Nowadays, universities have classes year round. Summer classes are very common albeit smaller and shorter but still abundant. At my university we have three small summer semesters in May, June, and July.
     
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