I'm up

  • Focalist

    Senior Member
    European Union, English
    A lot depends on context, but "I'm up" can mean "(ya) estoy levantado".
    -- Are you still in bed?
    -- No, I'm up.

    F
     

    Focalist

    Senior Member
    European Union, English
    Antonio said:
    "If you don't get out of here this place is going up" What does this sentence try to imply?
    That it's going up in flames, i.e. that it's going to be burnt... down.

    F
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    Focalist said:
    That it's going up in flames, i.e. that it's going to be burnt... down.

    F

    Or, blown up by a bomb or something like that.

    But the sentence, "If you don't get out of here this place is going up", is a little strange. It seems to be implying that if you get out the place is not going up, but if you stay it will.

    It would make more sense to say, ''You better get out of here. This place is going up any minute now.''

    Or, ''If you don't get out of here you're going to be sorry. It's going up any time now.''
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Usually to be on the ball means to be organized or to know what is happening. Of course, it can also mean to actually be on top of the ball. For example, "You have to be on the ball before you can score" (== you need to holding the ball).

    I would say to be in the game means to play [the game]. Example: "Get in the game, Joe!" (== they are asking Joe to come play the game with them).
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Antonio said:
    to be in the game means to be aware or to know what's going on around you, right?
    to be on the ball means this. I've never heard to be in the game used to mean this, though.
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Antonio said:
    to be in the game means to be aware or to know what's going on around you, right?

    Yes, this is correct. Sometimes it is said, "Get with the ballgame" or just "get with the game" which means "follow what I'm saying" or "pay attention". If you use it as "to be in the game" it is basically the same, that you are paying attention to what's going on.
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    jacinta said:
    Yes, this is correct. Sometimes it is said, "Get with the ballgame" or just "get with the game" which means "follow what I'm saying" or "pay attention". If you use it as "to be in the game" it is basically the same, that you are paying attention to what's going on.
    Interesting. I never would have used this. Well, you learn something new every day. ;)
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Nick said:
    Interesting. I never would have used this. Well, you learn something new every day. ;)

    Nick, you've heard "it's in the ballpark" when you're saying, "it's close to that" or 'it's somewhere around there", haven't you? All of these sayings come from baseball terminology: get with the game, in the game, on the ball, etc. I don't see your age but maybe these are all old terms?? Doesn't really matter in the grand scheme of things, does it?
     

    tim

    Member
    Australia, English
    It is important to remember that a lot of these expressions that you ask about, Antonio, which are constructed from verbs and prepositions have meanings which depend greatly on context.

    As others have said, the expression "I'm up", if standing on its own without any other context given, generally means "I'm out of bed", but can also mean "I am standing up" (if the person has been asked to do so, for example).

    Colloquially and in regards to sex it might also have a different meaning, which I will leave to your imagination.

    Once again, as others have said, to say, "I'm up for that", means "I am interested in doing that" or "I would like to do that". (e.g. "Would you be up for going to the movies tonight?", "Are you up for a drink?" etc.)
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    tim said:
    Colloquially and in regards to sex it might also have a different meaning, which I will leave to your imagination.

    Once again, as others have said, to say, "I'm up for that", means "I am interested in doing that" or "I would like to do that". (e.g. "Would you be up for going to the movies tonight?", "Are you up for a drink?" etc.)

    Can someone please, give me an example, of sex using the word "up" and in the second sentences that you put on example; I think it basically means ready or on, right?
     

    Special K

    Member
    USA English
    "In the game" often does not refer to being in a game at all, but some other, often serious, activity.

    For instance, a stock trader may say "to make money you've got to be in the game." That is, you've got to be trading stock. If you're not "in the game" you are sitting on the sidelines.
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    tim said:
    Colloquially and in regards to sex it might also have a different meaning, which I will leave to your imagination.QUOTE]

    Can someone please explain to me, the sex connotation that you give in English to the word "up"?
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    Antonio said:
    Can someone please explain to me, the sex connotation that you give in English to the word "up"?

    Bueno, Antonio, since everybody seems too shy to mention it, I will blush and say:

    As you know, there is a certain part of the male body that a man must get up (= raise) in order for the act to take place. So with this in mind you can imagine how some libidinous minds might interpret, ''I'm up for it".

    But you should be aware that, ''I'm up for it'', usually only means something like, "I'm willing to go (to the movies, game, whatever).'' And unless you have a lustful grin on you face when you say it, nobody will interpret it sexually.
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    Edwin said:
    Or, But the sentence, "If you don't get out of here this place is going up", is a little strange. It seems to be implying that if you get out the place is not going up, but if you stay it will.
    Well, just for the sake of my comprehension I'd like to go back to this (earlier) stage of the thread. I understand the sentence originally posted like this:

    The one who will be told this has probably annoyed, disturbed or provoked (by his mere presence, his manners or behaviour) a certain group of people (in a meeting, on a rally, a party or anything alse) to a degree that emotions can hardly be kept calm. So s.b. is trying to explain that it would be better for him to leave to prevent further excitement (which might result in some uproar). Thinking this way, the sentence doesn't sound that strange to me - or am I completely off the track?
     

    openmind

    Member
    Germany, German
    So what is the difference then between I'm up for it and I'm up to it? Does up for it mean to like? And does up to mean plan to as in What are you up to? Thanks. O
     

    Special K

    Member
    USA English
    openmind said:
    So what is the difference then between I'm up for it and I'm up to it? Does up for it mean to like? And does up to mean plan to as in What are you up to? Thanks. O
    "I'm up for it" means I am interested in doing whatever activity is on offer. As in - Q: Who wants to go to a movie? A: I'm up for it. Or -- Is anyone up for going to a movie?

    As for "up to" you don't really say "up to it." You might say "what are you up to?" meaning what are you doing. A lot of times a parent might say to their child "what are you up to?" when they think the child is doing something wrong. Or, you might call a friend and say "what are you up to?" meaning "what are you doing right now or in the immediate future?"
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    Special K said:
    As for "up to" you don't really say "up to it." You might say "what are you up to?" meaning what are you doing.

    Hey, Special K, the second meaning below must have slipped your mind:

    This from WordReference.com (English Definition)

    -------------------------------------------------------------
    up to
    A adjective
    1 busy or occupied with; "what have you been up to?"; "up to no good"

    2 adequate to, capable, equal to, having the requisite qualities for; "the work isn't up to the standard I require"
    --------------------------------------------------------------

    So one might ask,
    ''Are you sure you can do that?"
    and the answer might be,
    "Sure, what makes you think I'm not up to it.''
    or
    "Sure, I'm up to it.''
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    Speaking of the sentence:

    "If you don't get out of here this place is going up"

    Ralf said:
    Well, just for the sake of my comprehension I'd like to go back to this (earlier) stage of the thread. I understand the sentence originally posted like this:

    The one who will be told this has probably annoyed, disturbed or provoked (by his mere presence, his manners or behaviour) a certain group of people (in a meeting, on a rally, a party or anything alse) to a degree that emotions can hardly be kept calm. So s.b. is trying to explain that it would be better for him to leave to prevent further excitement (which might result in some uproar). Thinking this way, the sentence doesn't sound that strange to me - or am I completely off the track?


    I agree. In that context it makes perfect sense. It was lack of imagination on my part.
     

    Jonegy

    Senior Member
    UK - English
    A suplimentary note on sexual conotations

    " being in the game" should not be confused with " being on the game"
    ;-)
     
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