I'm using false lashes that are more to the dramatic side than my usual falsies

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shorty1

Senior Member
Korean
Hello.


This is part of a make-up video with English subtitles a Korean girl made on Youtube.

...
I'm using false lashes that are more to the dramatic side than my usual falsies because I wanna make the eyes look really big and beautiful.

The girl was refering to voluminous false lashes in Korean.
I'm not sure if she used a translating program for the English subtitles.

If it's natural, could you rephrase the bolded part?


Thank you for your help.
 
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  • goldenband

    Senior Member
    English - American
    One could simply say "...false lashes that are more dramatic [i.e. in appearance] than my usual [etc.]..."

    The original sentence is reasonable, but I would prefer:

    I'm using false lashes that are [a bit] more on the dramatic side than my usual...

    Also, in my experience "falsies" refers to padding in a brassiere to make a woman's bust look larger, so I'm surprised to see it used for fake eyelashes. Apparently that use is known, but it was unfamiliar to me.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    The only meaning that readily comes to my mind when I hear "falsies" is "false breasts", not "false eyelashes", so I find the sentence to be not merely less than natural, but bizarre and ludicrous in a way the speaker clearly did not mean.

    Also please note that there is no such word as "wanna". Unless you are deliberately trying to imitate the sound of the speech of careless speakers, you should never, ever write "want to" as "wanna."
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you very much, goldenband and GreenWhiteBlue. :)

    I think she used a wrong word by mistake.

    'On' must go better with 'the dramatic side' than 'to'.

    I get it.
     

    goldenband

    Senior Member
    English - American
    The only meaning that readily comes to my mind when I hear "falsies" is "false breasts", not "false eyelashes"
    Same here, but apparently it's a known and (to me) surprisingly widespread use. See here:

    falsies - definition of falsies in English from the Oxford dictionary

    Also please note that there is no such word as "wanna".
    I would prefer to say that it's unacceptable in standard written English -- but certainly very well known in informal use, where it reproduces colloquial (or children's) pronunciation of "want to". Saying that there's "no such word" is potentially misleading, since "wanna" has an entry in the Oxford English Dictionary, has acquired a fixed spelling, and is even used by businesses (see "Wanna Get Away").

    Our mandate is to use standard English in our posts, but not to deny the existence of well-known colloquialisms, even if some of us find them irritating.
     
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    Green, that's a bit harsh, as I see it. Shorty may have been quoting a subtitle with 'wanna'.

    The meaning of 'falsies' in context is obvious (and in at least one dictionary); so I'd say--my opinion-- it's closer to 'instantly understandable' than 'bizarre and ludicrous'.

    The only meaning that readily comes to my mind when I hear "falsies" is "false breasts", not "false eyelashes", so I find the sentence to be not merely less than natural, but bizarre and ludicrous in a way the speaker clearly did not mean.

    Also please note that there is no such word as "wanna". Unless you are deliberately trying to imitate the sound of the speech of careless speakers, you should never, ever write "want to" as "wanna."
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Here's an example from 1949 where "wearing falsies" refers to a man wearing false teeth. As long as we know which body-part is false, it has a wider application than "padded bra".

    His front uppers had been removable ever since one of the Luna experimentals had set in with a smash that broke his shock chair straps, but still he felt there was something comical and faintly disreputable about wearing falsies.
    The Best Science-fiction Stories and Novels

    There are even "bum falsies" available:
    No ifs, ands or butts

    And a mascara marketed under the registered trade mark "Falsies":
    Volum' Express The Falsies Waterproof Mascara - Maybelline

    Added: I agree with "on the dramatic side".
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thanks for making time to share your opinions, folks. :)


    I'm very sorry for making you confused. It was my mistake I didn't clarify the question. :oops:

    Yes. The subtitles said 'wanna' as bennymix said and I just wrote it down.

    And I've found out there are various kinds of falsies for specific body parts respectively.

    What you explained have been very helpful.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I made the sentence to see if it makes sense if 'much' is used instead of 'more'.

    "I like girls wearing false lashes that are much on the dramatic side."

    I took it as meaning I like girls wearing luxuriant long false lashes something like camels' eyelashes.

    Did I get it right?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I made the sentence to see if it makes sense if 'much' is used instead of 'more'.

    "I like girls wearing false lashes that are much on the dramatic side."

    I took it as meaning I like girls wearing luxuriant long false lashes something like camels' eyelashes.

    Did I get it right?
    No. It would have to be "more on the dramatic side" or "much more on the dramatic side". "More" is the comparative for "much".
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    No. It would have to be "more on the dramatic side" or "much more on the dramatic side". "More" is the comparative for "much".
    Thank you very much, Packard. :)

    Ahh, so, 'being more on the dramatic side' must be the comparative form for 'being on the dramatic side', not for 'being much on the dramatic side', right?

    And if so, what does 'false eyelashes that are on the dramatic side' mean?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Thank you very much, Packard. :)

    Ahh, so, 'being more on the dramatic side' must be the comparative form for 'being on the dramatic side', not for 'being much on the dramatic side', right?

    And if so, what does 'false eyelashes that are on the dramatic side' mean?
    It means "adding more drama". But that can be ambiguous in meaning.

    Kim Kardashian wears false eyelashes. It is supposed to add a dimension to her eyes the top picture is with the false eyelashes and the bottom one is without:

    The "with" image is certainly more theatrical. If that is your understanding of "dramatic" then it works for me.



     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    It means "adding more drama". But that can be ambiguous in meaning.

    Kim Kardashian wears false eyelashes. It is supposed to add a dimension to her eyes the top picture is with the false eyelashes and the bottom one is without:

    The "with" image is certainly more theatrical. If that is your understanding of "dramatic" then it works for me.



    I've understood, Packard. Thanks a lot. :)


    I don't like his manner of behavior and speaking on the dramatic side from when he meets girls.

    I was meant to say I don't like his unnatural and exaggerated manner of behavior and speaking from when he meets girls.

    Is it understandable?
     
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    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    "It is a bit on the dramatic side." (Unusual but, in my view, colloquial.)

    "... speaking on the dramatic side." (Not colloquial.)

    When Lou Reed came out with Take a Walk on the Wild Side, it wasn't exactly a known expression, I believe. It has become well known, but it remains informal slang. So you can get away with saying things like your sentence, but you have to realize it will be seen as informal slang at best, non-idiomatic at worst.

    Having said that, I think your original sentence is OK, but I would say "on" rather than "to":

    I'm using false lashes that are more on the dramatic side than my usual falsies because I wanna make the eyes look really big and beautiful.

    About "falsies" I have no idea. As far as I'm concerned women have an alien vocabulary when it comes to beauty products. ;)
     
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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    When Lou Reed came out with Take a Walk on the Wild Side, it wasn't exactly a known expression, I believe.
    Nelson Algren's 1956 novle "A Walk on the Wild Side" was made into the film "Walk on the Wild Side" in 1962. The film starred Jane Fonda and Barbara Stanwyck so it wasn't a minor film. The title song was nominated for an Academy Award.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think "overly dramatic" sounds more idiomatic.

    "Slightly theatrical" or just plain "theatrical" work too in some instances.

    But for me "I think he is overly dramatic when speaking with girls" works better than "dramatic side" (which is an expression I have not heard much or perhaps at all).
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thanks for your time, RedwoodGlrove, Myridon and Packard. :)

    It doesn't work for the cases I extended.

    I get it.
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    You could say "His way of speaking with girls is on the dramatic side" or "I hate when his way of speaking to girls veers to the dramatic side" - the metaphor to keep in mind to use these expressions about "on the __ side" or "to the __ side" is that there's some space and one side is more dramatic or wild or what have you and the other side is less so. The activity is then taking place on the more __ side or the less ___ side, on the wild side or the tame side, on the dramatic side or the boring side :)
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    You could say "His way of speaking with girls is on the dramatic side" or "I hate when his way of speaking to girls veers to the dramatic side" - the metaphor to keep in mind to use these expressions about "on the __ side" or "to the __ side" is that there's some space and one side is more dramatic or wild or what have you and the other side is less so. The activity is then taking place on the more __ side or the less ___ side, on the wild side or the tame side, on the dramatic side or the boring side :)

    You explained to me a fundamental reason 'on the _ side' or 'to the _ side is supposed to be used in a way that is easy to understand.

    Thank you very much, Truffula. :)
     
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