I'm very big with the under-5 set.

gonecar

Senior Member
Chinese-Mandarin Chinese
Hello, everyone.
I watched a video and heard this conversation.

Man: I'm Mike Delfino. I just started renting the Sims' house next door.

Lady: Susan Mayer. I live across the street.

Man: Oh, yeah, Mrs. Huber told me about you, said you illustrate children's books.

Lady: Yeah, I'm very big with the under-5 set. What do you do?

Man: Plumber.



I am very big with the under-5 set.

Does it mean "I mainly work at the books for under 5 -year-old children." or "I am good at the books for under 5 -year-old children"? Or neither of them.

Thank you very much.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I take it to mean “My work is very popular with young kids”, but it comes across as either rather arrogant or meant as a joke (implying: at least people appreciate my work up to the age of 5!).
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    If a popular children's book illustrator said that to me I would not take it as arrogant. I am very popular among children who are less than five years old is much more arrogant-sounding than I'm very big with the under-five set. I'm very big sounds arrogant by itself, but then she deflates it with the under-five set, which is a very joking, but affectionate, way of referring to small children.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I agree. It's self-deprecating. She is acknowledging she is not a world famous author like Hemingway. She has a certain level of fame, but it's limited to very simple children's books.
     

    gonecar

    Senior Member
    Chinese-Mandarin Chinese
    I take it to mean “My work is very popular with young kids”, but it comes across as either rather arrogant or meant as a joke (implying: at least people appreciate my work up to the age of 5!).
    Oh, it turns out to be a joke, but I just failed to realise it. No wonder I heard their chortles.
    Thank you, lingobingo.
     

    gonecar

    Senior Member
    Chinese-Mandarin Chinese
    If a popular children's book illustrator said that to me I would not take it as arrogant. I am very popular among children who are less than five years old is much more arrogant-sounding than I'm very big with the under-five set. I'm very big sounds arrogant by itself, but then she deflates it with the under-five set, which is a very joking, but affectionate, way of referring to small children.
    It is so effective a sentence,but I just failed to learn it.
    Thanks to your explanation, I have made the most out of it.
    Thank you, Roxxxannne.
     
    Last edited:

    sinukg

    Senior Member
    Malayalam
    If a popular children's book illustrator said that to me I would not take it as arrogant. I am very popular among children who are less than five years old is much more arrogant-sounding than I'm very big with the under-five set. I'm very big sounds arrogant by itself, but then she deflates it with the under-five set, which is a very joking, but affectionate, way of referring to small children.
    Can we say "I am very popular among children who are under five years old"?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There are nearly always various ways you could say the same thing. But why would anyone say “children who are under five years old” when they could just say “under-fives”?
     
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