I'm very much interested in buying your home.

weebmanish

Senior Member
Hindi
Which version is correct:

1. I'm very interested in buying your home.
2. I'm much interested in buying your home.
3. I'm very much interested in buying your home.


I think the first one is correct and second one is most likely wrong, but I have no clue about the third one. Please help.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    Number 3 is correct. Number 2 is wrong.

    Number 1 sounds awkward. I'm not sure why. These both sound quite natural:

    I'm very interested.
    I'm interested in buying your home.
     

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Which version is correct:

    1. I'm very interested in buying your home.
    2. I'm much interested in buying your home.
    3. I'm very much interested in buying your home.


    I think the first one is correct and second one is most likely wrong, but I have no clue about the third one. Please help.
    Which is "correct"? It depends on who you ask, and how they view grammar. To me, they are all "correct," meaning that they get the same message across, which is being "interested" to a high degree.

    That said, very much is an idiom, and you might want to keep idioms as they are. I suppose the issue with 2. is that, for some, "much" belongs in "negative environments" (I don't like you much) and rarely appear in "positive environments." To me, that's a general observation rather than a "rule," so I'm not bothered by this use of much, especially when it looks and acts like the reduced version of the idiom very much.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    I'm not bothered by this use of much
    I am bothered by example 2. My only issue is this: it seems wrong to me. I have never studied the "environments in which must appears". I don't think must "derives from" the phrase very much, or that very much is an idiom.

    The sentence "I'm much interested in buying your home." lasts for 2 seconds, then the next sentence happens. Who has time to consider the environment or derivation of each word? That isn't part of speaking and listening. It is part of academic linguistic study.

    It depends on who you ask, and how they view grammar.
    I view grammars (there is not one "correct" grammar, for English) as artificial systems (rules, terminology) that attempt to describe the way people speak the language.

    I also view grammars as a useful tool in learning a new language. But grammars cannot define every correct sentence and every incorrect sentence. Languages are far too complicated for that. So eventually every student must move beyond grammars.
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    In BE one would quibble about buying a home. Home is where I live. If I move house I used to be at home at address A, but now live at address B. One was my home, the other is my home. Home is restricted to certain usages for example at home, going home, leaving home. One would not talk about selling a home, but rather selling a house.
     

    weebmanish

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    In BE one would quibble about buying a home. Home is where I live. If I move house I used to be at home at address A, but now live at address B. One was my home, the other is my home. Home is restricted to certain usages for example at home, going home, leaving home. One would not talk about selling a home, but rather selling a house.
    You're right. "House" should be used instead of "home".
     

    Toby Sherman

    Member
    American English
    In BE one would quibble about buying a home. Home is where I live. If I move house I used to be at home at address A, but now live at address B. One was my home, the other is my home. Home is restricted to certain usages for example at home, going home, leaving home. One would not talk about selling a home, but rather selling a house.
    The same is true in American English for those who speak it carefully. However, you will commonly find this use of "home" instead of "house" in commercial language, because "home" has warm and pleasant connotations that "house" lacks.
     
    Top