imbucarsi a una festa

VanessaW

Member
English - England
Hi, I'm not sure how to translate this sentence from Niccolo' Ammaniti's book Fango.

"Casomai imbucarsi a una festa"

- a character is talking about options of what to do for New Year's Eve.

I get the idea of what it is saying but I don't know how to put it in words.

Thanks.
 
  • pask46

    Senior Member
    Italy-italian
    "Imbucarsi" is an improper use of the verb "imbucare" which means, literally, putting letters or postcards into the mail box. Used in this form (reflexive) has taken the meaning of "infiltrarsi" = leak in, infiltrate, also used figuratively for people (spies, for example).
    Imbucarsi has a lighter meaning, referring to those who enter a party without an invitation... that's exactly your case, at a new year's eve party!
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Here in North America we usually forget the gate and just crash the party. :) Although, it may just be me, but to crash a party is not a subtle way of going to a party, you can show up with a group of people and crash it. Every one knows you're there. To sneak into a party implies a lot more discretion.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Here in North America we usually forget the gate and just crash the party. :) Although, it may just be me, but to crash a party is not a subtle way of going to a party, you can show up with a group of people and crash it. Every one knows you're there. To sneak into a party implies a lot more discretion.
    Most dictionaries don't stipulate how one gains admittance, but I agree that the word "crash" doesn't give the impression of discretion. However this dictionary gives "gatecrasher" the definition of someone who enters a "theatre without a ticket", which is more than likely to be done discreetly. It doesn't really make sense.
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Yes the way I've heard gatecrasher used is more for ticketed events. Crashing a party is a very common expression like I've indicated above.
    E imbucarsi??
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    OP translates imbucarsi a una festa with (gate)crash a party.
    In BE we definitely gatecrash parties; I can't say I'd use in reference to another kind of event (but maybe that's me...). I've only ever heard crash a party in the US (and I see the Canadians use it as well!;)). However, at this stage, you can use either, I think. If you're talking to an AE speaker you say "crash", if you're talking to a BE/AusE speaker you say "gatecrash"!:)
     

    maxper

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Most dictionaries don't stipulate how one gains admittance, but I agree that the word "crash" doesn't give the impression of discretion. However this dictionary gives "gatecrasher" the definition of someone who enters a "theatre without a ticket", which is more than likely to be done discreetly. It doesn't really make sense.
    In Italian, Imbucarsi definely means (gate)crash a party, that is without being invited (generally no ticket admittance is necessary). In case someone enters theater without a ticket we use to call him "portoghese", that means portuguese (ha fatto il portoghese, oppure è entrato da portoghese) :D
    It is a little OT but for italian speaking people, check this page:

    http://www.exmontevecchio.com/perche.html
     

    Azazel81

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    In Italian, Imbucarsi definely means (gate)crash a party, that is without being invited (generally no ticket admittance is necessary). In case someone enters theater without a ticket we use to call him "portoghese", that means portuguese (ha fatto il portoghese, oppure è entrato da portoghese) :D
    It is a little OT but for italian speaking people, check this page:

    http://www.exmontevecchio.com/perche.html
    Wow.. I didn't know this "portuguese" thing.. :D may I ask where it is used?

    Anyway, I've heard many times my friends from NY/LA say: "come on guys, let's crash this party and take all chick for ourselves" (actually I've heard it in an even more slang-y version, but the gist is totally the same and with "crash" in it).
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    In Italian, Imbucarsi definely means (gate)crash a party, that is without being invited (generally no ticket admittance is necessary). In case someone enters theater without a ticket we use to call him "portoghese", that means portuguese (ha fatto il portoghese, oppure è entrato da portoghese) :D
    It is a little OT but for italian speaking people, check this page:

    http://www.exmontevecchio.com/perche.html
    In the situation where someone enters a theatre without a ticket, I would say, He sneaked/snuck in without paying (for a ticket). :)
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Regarding sneaking into the movies, fare il portoghese, etc., see here. (After post #3, the discussion is mostly about the word movie house, but from post #21 they talk about fare il portoghese.)
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Wow.. I didn't know this "portuguese" thing.. :D may I ask where it is used? Naples and Salerno for sure: it's a very common expression down here!:D
    We certainly wouldn't gatecrash a bus!:) You'd sneak off without buying a ticket, I suppose (although it's a bit more difficult these days, or at least it is in London, where you have to pay as you get on!:D).

    NB Charles, we don't say "snuck" in BE, but "sneaked": what do you normally say in AusE?
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    NB Charles, we don't say "snuck" in BE, but "sneaked": what do you normally say in AusE?
    We use both here, but "snuck" is probably preferred.

    I found this in one of the online dictionaries:

    First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak: Bored by the lecture, he snuck out the side door. Snuck occurs frequently in fiction and in journalistic writing as well as on radio and television: In the darkness the sloop had snuck around the headland, out of firing range .................(The rest is here)
     
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