immanent sublime

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ebrahim

Senior Member
Persian
Salaam,

I don't understand what the writer mean by 'immanent sublime' as well as the parenthesized chunk. Would you please be kind enough to explain a bit?

"The supernatural in the baroque was not a matter of the afterlife, but of an immanent realm just beyond the sublunary veil of the everyday. It was habitable; and it touched on the quotidian at every turn. Perhaps most of all, as Ndalianis notes, the everyday articulates with the immanent (if perpetually deferred) sublime through a technology which is itself an object of awe. This technically mediated beyond at once exists and does not exist."

Film Theory and Contemporary Hollywood Movies, chapter two: The Supernatural in Neo-baroque Hollywood, by Sean Cubitt
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    I believe the immanent sublime here refers to a supernatural realm inhabited by gods. I believe that the parenthesized phrase is a joke, since immanent sounds similar to imminent.
     

    Heermione

    Member
    French - France
    I personnaly think that it could be rephrased like that : " the everyday articulates with the undiscutable beauty through a technologie which is itself an object of awe." Meaning the everyday life is beautiful when shown by the camera, or something like that (hope I was clear enough). But I'm not english born so I might be wrong ^^'
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I believe the immanent sublime here refers to a supernatural realm inhabited by gods. I believe that the parenthesized phrase is a joke, since immanent sounds similar to imminent.
    This works for me. I'd probably say them the same, using a schwa sound for that central vowel, unless I was trying to highlight the difference with careful pronunciation.

    I didn't know what immanent means, but see it is an adjective modifying the sublime. In this case sublime could mean a lot of things, but all of them would be to do with height, status, one possible definition is this:
    That quality in nature or art which inspires awe, reverence, or other high emotion; the great beauty of grandeur of an object, place, etc.
    I notice he uses beyond as a noun there, not very common, but here in the OED:
    C. n.
    Thesaurus »
    1. That which lies on the other side or farther away, the remote or distant; that which lies beyond one's present life or experience.
     
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