implicate/involve

loureed4

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi,

I am drawing up an email in these terms:

"What do you think of the new policy to implicate/involve the private sector in the running of the public transport system?"

Well, I really don´t know which of the bold words to use in this context. I often use "involve" but saw that the word "implicate" exists and now I came into this question.

Thanks in advance!
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    I often use "involve" but saw that the word "implicate" exists...
    Beware of thesauri! Remember, no two words are exactly synonymous. We mostly use "implicate" to indicate that it seems that someone has been involved in a crime or some other unethical/immoral action.

    I think it's often better to use the words you know and understand. Sometimes, when you attempt to use a fancy new word, you can create some unexpected and unwanted connotations - especially in English, since we have so many words.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    If you will check the dictionary here for implicate, you will see that the first two definitions show the word's pejorative definitions ... and that's how we generally use it.

    I don't think that's your intention.

    Edit: Cross-posted with lucas-sp, who offers excellent advice.
     
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    loureed4

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I totally agree Lucas-sp about using a fancy new word you have just learnt, but that is because one wants to widen/broad his vocabulary. :rolleyes:

    NO, clearly that´s not my intention sdgraham, :) .

    So, definitely I have to use "involve", don´t I?. I don´t know what I would do without so helpful people like you!!. :eek:
     

    loureed4

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    << --- threads merged here --- >>

    Hello,


    I trying to make this sentence:


    "They are trying to carry out that policy to implicate/involve the private sector in the running of several public affairs"

    Should I used "implicate" or instead "involve"?. I also am doubting whether I should use the gerund (implicating/involving). In my opinion, as a non-native speaker, "implicate" or "implicating" fits in much properly.

    Thanks in advance!
     
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    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It depends what you want to say. The words 'implicate' and 'involve' have different meanings (you can look them up in the Wordreference dictionary).

    "to implicate" means to show to be involved.

    I don't see how you could use the gerund here. Could you write the sentence in full to show what you mean?
     

    loureed4

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thanks Biffo!!

    Yes, I checked the dictionary but sometimes is not that easy to figure out words that seems so similar.

    What do you mean "in full" ? . I already wrote the whole sentence, if that is what you refer to. :)
     
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    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thanks Biffo!!

    Yes, I checked the dictionary but sometimes is not that easy to figure out words that seems so similar.

    What do you mean "in full" ? . I already wrote it the whole sentence, if that is what you refer to. :)
    If you 'implicate' someone, it means that you show that they were involved in something, e.g

    The police found some evidence that implicated John in the crime ---> The police found some evidence that showed that John was involved in the crime.

    I meant can you write a full sentence using the gerund. You cannot simply substitute "to involve" with "to involving". I presume you have some other formulation. :)
     

    loureed4

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    If you 'implicate' someone, it means that you show that they were involved in something, e.g

    The police found some evidence that implicated John in the crime ---> The police found some evidence that showed that John was involved in the crime.

    I meant can you write a full sentence using the gerund. You cannot simply substitute "to involve" with "to involving". I presume you have some other formulation. :)

    Thanks again Biffo!

    I am trying to figure out your example about the police. I am sure that when I read tomorrow all your replies I´ll understand it much better because sometimes I am so much into something that I need a bit of "fresh" air or just make up 4 sentences , things like those.

    As for the gerund, I don´t have other formulations, just that sometimes (to my amazement) I see "to + gerund" , because I thought that after "to" always came "infinitive" and not "gerund". :)
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    ...As for the gerund, I don´t have other formulations, just that sometimes (to my amazement) I see "to + gerund" , because I thought that after "to" always came "infinitive" and not "gerund". :)
    Can you give an example that you have seen that uses 'to' with the gerund? I can't think of a plausible one. I expect it is possible but not as a substitute for the infinitive.
     

    loureed4

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Well, I really don´t remember now Biffo, but whenever I saw it I got a bit puzzled. ...I just found this one (but I know of others): "I am looking forward to seeing you" . But I know of others I can´t remember now.

    Thanks alot Biffo!
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Well, I really don´t remember now Biffo, but whenever I saw it I got a bit puzzled. ...I just found this one (but I know of others): "I am looking forward to seeing you" . But I know of others I can´t remember now.

    Thanks alot Biffo!
    I realise now that there are two separate questions in this thread, one about the meaning of "to implicate" and one about the use of gerunds!

    I wonder if you would like to start a separate thread about "I am looking forward to seeing you":) ?
     
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