in all your state

Hi everyone,

in the dialogue below from Pride & Prejudice (from the film of 2005), I don't understand what Ms. Bennet (Keira Knightley) means by saying to Mr. Darcy (Matthew Macfadyen) "coming in all your state". Does it have to do with "stately", as Mr. Darcy is a grand/imposing and thus stately character in this film? - Please see below the dialogue between the two, when Ms. Bennet is "forced" by her Ladyship (Judi Dench as Lady de Bourgh) to play the piano forte at Rosing's estate:

"Elizabeth Bennet: [Playing the piano] You mean to frighten me Mr. Darcy by coming in all your state to hear me. But I won't be alarmed even if your sister does play so well.
Mr. Darcy: I'm well enough acquainted with you, Miss Elizabeth, that I cannot alarm you even if I should wish it."

Along these lines, I can't help but think of the false friend in modern French (which may not have been a false friend in old French) : être dans tous ces états.

Is my assumption above (in regard to "stately") correct?
Is "coming in all your state" still used nowadays? If no, what would be its closest equivalent in modern English?

Thank you so much in advance.
The USE.
 
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  • moustic

    Senior Member
    English (Yorkshire)
    Yes, its meaning is close to stately:
    state: status or position in life, esp. for a person of wealth and rank: to travel in state.
    And no, "coming in all your state" wouldn't be used nowadays.

    I can't think of anything concise that would be used in modern English. (I don't think women are as impressed by men now as they were at that time ;))
     
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    misterk

    Moderator
    English-American
    Just FYI, the text of novel reads slightly differently:
    “You mean to frighten me, Mr. Darcy, by coming in all this state to hear me?..."
    (This doesn't affect your question. This turn of phrase is not used in modern English.)
     
    Yes, its meaning is close to stately:

    And no, "coming in all your state" wouldn't be used nowadays.

    I can't think of anything concise that would be used in modern English. (I don't think women are as impressed by men now as they were at that time ;))
    Thank you very much for the rapid response.

    So it does have something to do with grand/imposing and thus stately, right?

    Cheers,
    The USE
     
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