In/At the beginning...

weird

Senior Member
SPAIN
Hello,

Please, How would you say: In or At the beginning?

I never know. I think I have seen both of them.

Thank you, very much!!
 
  • VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    weird said:
    Please, How would you say: In or At the beginning?
    I never know. I think I have seen both of them.
    Weird: Is this a question strictly regarding English? Or, do you want their equivalents in Spanish?

    English: Depends on context. Can you give some?
    Spanish: al principio, a principios
     

    weird

    Senior Member
    SPAIN
    VenusEnvy said:
    Weird: Is this a question strictly regarding English? Or, do you want their equivalents in Spanish?

    English: Depends on context. Can you give some?
    Spanish: al principio, a principios
    Hello,

    I would like to know which preposition I have to use.

    For instance:

    In or at the beginning of our relation...

    or

    In or at the beginning of the history...

    In or at the beginning of 20th century....

    etc.

    For example, the rule is that I have to say: On Monday, In winter... etc

    Bye :)
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    weird said:
    In or at the beginning of our relation...
    At the beginning of our relationship . . .

    In or at the beginning of the history...
    They are interchangeable? When I Googled them, I received more hits for "In the beginning of history"

    In or at the beginning of 20th century....
    They are interchangeable? When I Googled them, I received more hits for "At the beginning of the 20th century" . . .

    For example, the rule is that I have to say: On Monday, In winter... etc
    Yes.
    This thread should be in the English Only forum.
    Hope I have helped, Weird!
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    I think that you use "at the beginning" when you refer to location of sth. Eg,
    "This word appears at the beginning of chapter 11" but you cannot say (!! this is my personal opinion) "This word appears in the beginning of chapter 11".
    Then when you refer to the time when you start doing sth, you can use both prepositions. Thus, "I enjoyed the film in/at the beginning, but then it turned so boring I went out of the cinema"


    Take this with a pinch of salt, I'm not sure. Let's wait for the experts.
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    I use those expressions exactly the way Art has described. Also, I don't think I'd say "in the beginning of history". For me, at the beginning of a sentence, "the beginning of" will always be preceded by "At" rather than "In".
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    garryknight said:
    I use those expressions exactly the way Art has described. Also, I don't think I'd say "in the beginning of history". For me, at the beginning of a sentence, "the beginning of" will always be preceded by "At" rather than "In".
    But:

    In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.... :)

    Of course there is no ''of'' here. I think you are right in the case of ''beginning of''. "At the beginning of...'' sounds much better. And the original question didn't have ''of''.
     
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