in/at the cemetery/graveyard

zaffy

Senior Member
Polish
Someone might be buried in a grave in a cemetery/graveyard, right?

However, which preposition do I pick if I say want to have a walk through a cemetery/graveyard with someone and want to meet them there? Would it matter if the meeting point was within the cemetery or in front of the gate?

I'll meet you in/at the graveyard at 5.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I'll meet you at the graveyard at 5. = at the entrance* to the graveyard.
    I'll meet you in the graveyard at 5. = inside the graveyard.

    A graveyard is inside the land around a church.
    A cemetery does not have a church attached to it, although it many have a small chapel.

    *or other place outside the graveyard that is known to both of you.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I'll meet you at the graveyard at 5. = at the entrance* to the graveyard.
    I'll meet you in the graveyard at 5. = inside the graveyard.

    Say there was some incident within the area of a graveyard, next to some grave. Does only "in" work?

    "There was a robbery in the graveyard last night."
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Short answer: "Yes".

    The "in" indicates, as I have said, inside, which, in this case, is the same as "within", and this is the information that you wish to convey.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Many people might use "at the graveyard" and not make the distinction between inside the place and at the gate or at some other point on its perimeter. But "in" can only mean inside the place.

    Likewise, I'll meet you at the coffee-shop. I'll be sitting at our usual table/I'll be waiting round the back.
     
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