in / at the cinema

  • Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    They are both correct. The meanig may differ depending on the version. Nurdug51, please tell what you want to say, to make the final choice.
     

    nurdug51

    Senior Member
    Germany,German
    They are both correct. The meanig may differ depending on the version. Nurdug51, please tell what you want to say, to make the final choice.


    The last film I watched in the cinema was ......
    The last filmthat I saw at the cinema was .....
    The last time I was at the cinema was when I watched ...
     

    Toadie

    Senior Member
    English
    For some reason I'm compelled to use 'at' with 'cinema' in all of those cases. I use 'in' much more with 'movie theater', and then again 'at' with 'movies'.
     

    Alex127

    New Member
    Russian - Russia
    Note: This discussion has been added to a previous thread. Cagey, moderator.

    What would be the correct answer to a question like "Where is your brother?"
    He is in the cinema or he is at the cinema?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Both answers are possible.
    At the cinema implies that he has gone to the cinema to watch a movie or to work there.
    In the cinema implies merely that he is physically inside the cinema.
     

    ch1896

    New Member
    German-Germany
    Hi, to continue this thread with another variation: Would it rather be "the 3 D glasses he's stolen at the cinema" - or "in the cinema"?
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I disagree with Andy's "neither would do". But what I didn't say in #12 was that the meanings are different.

    "the 3 D glasses he's stolen at the cinema" = "...stolen while watching the film at the cinema"
    "the 3 D glasses he's stolen in the cinema" = "...stolen somewhere inside the cinema building"
    "the 3 D glasses he's stolen from the cinema" = "... stolen, which belonged to the cinema"
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    He is in the cinema or he is at the cinema?
    ". . . at the cinema."

    Would it be "the 3 D glasses he's stolen at the cinema" - or "in the cinema"?
    I agree with Andy (post #13): Neither. It would be ". . . from the cinema". When you pick up something that isn't yours and take it away with you, you steal from.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    How can you say that ". . . from the cinema" is the only correct answer? What if the glasses were the personal property of Mrs Murgatroyd, a cinema-goer, and having stolen them he threw them in the waste bin so they never left the building? There would be no justification at all in using "from", in my version of English.

    "...the 3D glasses he stole from Mrs Murgatroyd in/at the cinema."
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Keith, if we have no specific context, the normally expected sentence uses "from". The alternatives only work if you create specific context to justify their use. Your contrived and quite unlikely context does, of course, justify using something other than "from". If ch1896 wants an answer for a specific context maybe he can tell us.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    A: I gave you and Parla plenty of possibility to admit as much, but you both insisted (#13 and #15) that there's only one possible answer... :rolleyes:

    B: Do you really think that the "from" version (which I take to indicate the victim) normally and habitually overrules the "at/in" options which indicate place? I really don't think it does. They're two separate issues, and need different prepositions.

    I'd be prepared to consider evidence, though I doubt that the habitual corpus searches will help us much.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I don't think that Mrs. Murgatroyd brought her own personal 3D glasses to the movie, Keith. At least here, they're handed out by the ticket-taker and one is expected to deposit them in a recycling bin on the way out.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    As I said, Keith, and you appear to have ignored, using a preposition other than "from" requires additional context, which we don't have.
    From implies ownership in this case. I would not use it for location.
    :confused:
    "He stole some apples from the market".
     
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