in case they've forgotten

IlyaTretyakov

Senior Member
Russian
Is it correct if I change 'they've forgotten' to 'they forgot'? Would it mean the same thing?
  1. I'll remind them about the meeting in case they've forgotten.
  2. I'll remind them about the meeting in case they forgot.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, you could say either.

    Both tenses express the same idea in this case, even though they look at it from different perspectives — when it was first forgotten / whether it is still forgotten now.
     

    IlyaTretyakov

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Yes, you could say either.

    Both tenses express the same idea in this case, even though they look at it from different perspectives — when it was first forgotten / whether it is still forgotten now.
    Could the second sentence (in case they forgot) also mean that it is still forgotten as the first one?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    < --- > In case they forgot only has one meaning, relating to a possible past action.

    The point of it is that if they did in fact forget, then they might not turn up at the meeting (which hasn’t happened yet).

    < Off -topic comment removed. Cagey, moderator >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    IlyaTretyakov

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I don’t think that question makes much sense, do you?
    I do. As far as I know, Americans often use the simple past instead of the present perfect. They can say 'He forgot about it' with the same meaning as 'He's forgotten about it'.

    That's why I'm asking that question.
    < Off topic comment removed. Cagey, moderator >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Is it correct if I change 'they've forgotten' to 'they forgot'? Would it mean the same thing?
    1. I'll remind them about the meeting in case they've forgotten.
    2. I'll remind them about the meeting in case they forgot.
    Could the second sentence (in case they forgot) also mean that it is still forgotten as the first one?
    They have forgotten it -- They don't remember it.
    They forgot it -- They don't remember it.

    They mean the same thing.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Could the second sentence (in case they forgot) also mean that it is still forgotten as the first one?
    I don't understand this question. Do you mean Could the second sentence (in case they forgot) also mean that it is still forgotten, which is what the first question means?
     
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