in effect or in fact

belongedto

Senior Member
Chinese
Source: Why Don't You Support Israel, Prager University

When I was Prime Minister of Canada, I was often asked this question: “Why do you support Israel?” My response, in effect, was always the same. Why wouldn’t I support Israel?

Can I use in fact instead of in effect?
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It depends whether the speaker was more used to speaking French (since this may be a gallicism), or whether they really meant to say "in effect", implying that they may not have always used the exact words, "Why wouldn't I support Israel", but something to that effect.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, when I see 'Canada' I immediately think they've used the French construction, which as velisarius says is very close to English 'in effect'. The English for it is 'in fact'.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The speaker was Stephen Harper, whose first language was English, so I assume he was using "in effect" correctly. "In effect" is not the same as "in fact". Velisarius explains the meaning of "in effect" in post 2.
     

    belongedto

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It depends whether the speaker was more used to speaking French (since this may be a gallicism), or whether they really meant to say "in effect",
    Yes, when I see 'Canada' I immediately think they've used the French construction, which as velisarius says is very close to English 'in effect'.
    The speaker was Stephen Harper, whose first language was English, so I assume he was using "in effect" correctly.
    Thank you.
     
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