In eigener Sache

derefed

New Member
U.S., English
What exactly does this phrase mean? I've seen it a few times. I know "die Sache" means "thing" or "business", and that "eigen-" means "own", but I've never seen "eigen-" separated from possessive pronouns such as "mein" or "dein". I can only guess that this phrase means something like "in one's own business", but I'm guessing it's an idiomatic expression I don't know and that its meaning is slightly different.
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Yes, it is highly idiomatic. It means "for one's own benefit", "for one's own sake". The Latin "pro domo" captures it nicely, I think.

    Some context, please? :)
     

    derefed

    New Member
    U.S., English
    The context in which I first heard it (and with which I'm most concerned) was in the title for an episode of the German translation of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. The English version's title was "For the Cause".

    The episode's plot dealt with the station commander's girlfriend being suspected of aiding terrorists, and his eventual coming to grips with the situation -- peaking with his having to arrest her himself. The end of the episode also saw one of the officers under his command betraying him and joining the terrorist's movement, as he believed their cause was just.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    OK, this is quite typical: Businesses or people do for themselves what they normally do for others. He was doing his work but his own interests were involved there.

    Another example: You are a blogger and post about vegetables. You tag your posts so that people interested in Carrot or Cucumbers can look up relevant posts easily. Besides many vegetables tags, you also have a tag In eigener Sache which you use to tell your readers that you are on holidays and won't be blogging next week, or to announce that your new blog about vegetables has just appeared (Werbung in eigener Sache - a very common term).

    Yet another example: You go to your favorite news website, and instead of the banner ads that are normally there, you see a logo of the website with In eigener Sache: We are currently looking for an experienced proofreader/editor.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi, often the idion means "on one's own behalf".

    It is often used to say that you speak for yourself.

    On court, you speak about your own cause, for yourself.
    (It may also be a group speaking on one's own behalf.)

    Another context may be:

    You are a news speaker or an actor. Usually you speak the news or to play. But one time, you speak "in eigener Sache". It does not belong to your tasks, but you feel it neccesary to say something on your own.

    In eigener Sache heißt: für sich selbst, im oberen Kontext: sich selbst vertretend.
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Also, falls ich für mich selbst sprechen will, soll ich sagen:
    In meiner Sache: I'm currenly looking for...
    Oder das ist eine fixierte Wendung?
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    "In eigener Sache" ist eine feste Redewendung. Oft wird es auch als Überschrift oder in Anzeigen verwendet.

    It is an idiom. It is used often in headings, or as Jana stated above, in own ads, not belonging to the topic.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Yet another example: You go to your favorite news website, and instead of the banner ads that are normally there, you see a logo of the website with In eigener Sache: We are currently looking for an experienced proofreader/editor.
    Jana, this is totally new for me. I have zero interest in business, so I've never run across this idiom. Is this possible?

    On a personal note: We are currently looking for an experienced proofreader/editor.

    I'm not at all sure about this. It's just a guess.

    Gaer

    PS: Found this in LEO

    Lot's of good suggestions there…
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Jana, this is totally new for me. I have zero interest in business, so I've never run across this idiom. Is this possible?

    On a personal note: We are currently looking for an experienced proofreader/editor.

    I'm not at all sure about this. It's just a guess.

    Gaer
    I had the same question when I first saw "in eigener Sache". Instead of asking here :rolleyes:, I tried to find an English equivalent but couldn't. We can wait for more native opinions but I tend to believe that it is one of those phrases that have no good translation (like the English "To whom it may concern"). "On a personal note" would be good for a blog whose owner wants to deviate from the usual business to share something personal, but hardly for a job ad, right?
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    On a personal note: - This would fit perfectly in this context if it is an idiomatic English phrase.
    It says: We are going out of the context of this page and tell you something essential, we want to tell you, because it is essential.

    "To whom it may concern" - has the same pragmatic contents here. But I am not sure, if you should use it in this context. Is it as serious and convincing as "On a personal note"?
    ---

    The translation has to be context sensitive.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    I had the same question when I first saw "in eigener Sache". Instead of asking here :rolleyes:, I tried to find an English equivalent but couldn't. We can wait for more native opinions but I tend to believe that it is one of those phrases that have no good translation (like the English "To whom it may concern"). "On a personal note" would be good for a blog whose owner wants to deviate from the usual business to share something personal, but hardly for a job ad, right?
    Right. It looks like something that has to be translated by context and content. And "on a personal note" is something that just occurred to me. I'm not sure myself what the ENGLISH boundaries are for this idiom.

    I THINK you could write something like this:

    On a personal note, we are looking for a person with experience to fill the position of ____.

    But I'd bow to the opinions of people who write these sorts of things.

    The other meaning, which LEO seemed to explain very well, would cover the "for it's own cause" meaning.

    This is hard!!! :(

    Gaer
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    "To whom it may concern" - has the same pragmatic contents here. But I am not sure, if you should use it in this context. Is it as serious and convincing as "On a personal note"?
    ---
    No! It was simply an example of a sentence that is hard to translate into other languages because the letter-writing conventions do not require it at all.

    Many apologies for the confusion I caused. :)
     

    wickerman

    Member
    US English
    It think "on a personal note" usually means you're about to describe something having to do with your private, personal life, in contrast to the business at hand, which has until that point been discussed. An online newspaper might use it jokingly in that context, but I don't think it really fits. As for a replacement though, nix fällt mir ein.
     

    Voxy

    Senior Member
    Deutschland, deutsch
    It think "on a personal note" usually means you're about to describe something having to do with your private, personal life, in contrast to the business at hand, which has until that point been discussed. An online newspaper might use it jokingly in that context, but I don't think it really fits. As for a replacement though, da fällt mir leider nix fällt mir ein.
    :)

    I still don't know, if "on a personal note" is an English idiom, or at least
    a very often used collocation. Can someone shed some light on this one?

    Voxy
     

    Cincimatti

    Member
    USA English
    I found in the dictionary under "Sache" to act on one's own account.

    The first thing I thought of was the question they ask when you open a bank account. "Will you be you conducting business on your own behalf? (or someone else's.)

    To act or deal in one's own interest. For one's own purpose/cause/agenda.

    Sorry, can't think of an introductory clause for business usage other than these. None that are really commonly used as a filler or segue.

    Searched local employment listings and came up with:

    Looking for a _ for our own office in downtown Cincinnati.
     

    wickerman

    Member
    US English
    :)

    I still don't know, if "on a personal note" is an English idiom, or at least
    a very often used collocation. Can someone shed some light on this one?

    Voxy
    Thanks for the correction!
    I can assure you that "on a personal note" is very gängig and used quite often to signal a change in topic to something, well, more personal. Use it at will!

    wickerman
     
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