In einer Garage abstellen

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  • Schlabberlatz

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    I think it's one of the cases that are not overly intuitive. If you use "stellen" instead of "abstellen", you need accusative:
    in die Garage stellen.
     

    Princess Banana

    Member
    French
    What would be the difference between the 2 expressions? I knew "in die Garage stellen" but "in der Garage abstellen" confused me, hence the thread.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    What would be the difference between the 2 expressions?
    Die Perspektive, aus der man die Situation betrachtet (aber in Wirklichkeit kommt es aufs Gleiche raus ;)).

    "Ich stelle das Auto in die Garage." ~ ich komme von außen und fahre das Auto in die Garage.
    "Ich stelle das Auto in der Garage ab." ~ ich bin (jetzt) in der Garage und stelle das Auto dort ab/ parke es dort."

    Cf.:
    abstellen
    1 b) etw. vorübergehend Unbenutztes abseits stellen, unterstellen
    das Auto (in einer Nebenstraße) abstellen (= parken)
     
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    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    Ich glaube, da ist ein kleiner Unterschied. Etwas irgendwohin stellen ist neutral.
    Aber wenn man etwas abstellt, bedeutet das manchmal, dass es etwas Unbrauchbares ist. Oder zumindest nicht oft benutzt wird. Siehe auch die Definition , die JClaudeK mit uns teilt.
     

    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    If you reflect a bit on it, it's not so weird that abstellen takes the Dativ while stellen comes with Akkusativ. "stellen", just like "put", needs a direction, a movement towards the place you put it; that's wohin, and that's Akkusativ.
    Of course you could say the same about the verb "abstellen", but you have to consider that "ab" is something like "away, off".So the place where you do this "abstellen" is not really the target for placing it, but any place; because what you're doing is not so much about putting the car in a certain place, but not put it there where you would put it for being used.
    I hope my idea gets through . . .
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    "Etwas in der Garage abstellen" entspricht "in der Garage ankommen".
    "Etwas in die Garage stellen" entspricht "in die Garage kommen".

    Ich stelle den Wagen in der Garage ab. ~~~ Der Wagen ist in der Garage angekommen.
    Ich stelle den Wagen in die Garage. ~~~ Der Wagen kommt in die Garage.

    Das Abstellen / das Ankommen findet in der Garage statt.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    "Ich stelle das Auto jetzt in die Garage." => Je vais mettre la voiture au garage.
    "Ich stelle das Auto jetzt in der Garage ab." => Je vais garer la voiture (et la laisser)/ laisser la voiture au garage.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Hi everyone!

    Why is "in" followed by the Dativ case if "abstellen" indicates a object moving?

    Thanks a lot!
    Abstellen (in contrast to stellen) only describes the act of leaving something at a place and not the previous process of taking it there. The garage is therefore the place where the event takes place and not the target of the action.
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    I think it's one of the cases that are not overly intuitive. If you use "stellen" instead of "abstellen", you need accusative:
    in die Garage stellen.

    Of course. With "abstellen" you are obviously already inside the determined space and not moving into it. It is less about intuition and more about imagining what is actually going on that triggers either A or D in our brains.
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Why is "in" followed by the Dativ case if "abstellen" indicates a object moving?
    Berndf explained it correctly: "Abstellen" is about leaving/putting something somewhere. In your paradigm it is about "where?" not "where to?". However, the focus on direction/location not always leads to the correct result.

    Wo stellst du etwas ab? In der Garage.
     

    Schlabberlatz

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    It is less about intuition and more about imagining what is actually going on that triggers either A or D in our brains.
    You may be right, but:
    However, the focus on direction/location not always leads to the correct result.
    I should have written: "not overly intuitive for learners of German", sorry. Native speakers of German don't have to think about it, so it's intuitive for them, I think. There have been numerous discussions here about "Wechselpräpositionen". There are some cases that are difficult for learners because…
    the focus on direction/location not always leads to the correct result.
    But there are cases that seem to be difficult even for native speakers! You can look here: in Akk./Dat. einmarschieren

    There seem to be regional differences, see here: in Akk./Dat. einmarschieren
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    There have been numerous discussions here about "Wechselpräpositionen". There are some cases that are difficult for learners because…
    Good to know: There are some verbs used with Wechselpräpositionen which are always followed by the dative, like "abstellen, ankommen, deponieren, lagern, ..... in + Dative".
     
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    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    It might help to know that "abholen" and "absetzen" are also used with the dative:

    Ich hole dich am Bahnhof ab und setze dich vor der Bäckerei ab.

    "den Wagen in der Garage abstellen" is basically the same idea as "Michael vor der Bäckerei absetzen".
     
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