In fiscal year ... - or - In the fiscal year ...

América

Senior Member
Español Bolivia
Which one of the next two sentences is correct:

1. In the fiscal year 2005 we implemented a pilot project...

2. In fiscal year 2005 we implemented a pilot project...

Thanks in advance
 
  • TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    I have always seen "fiscal year 2005" where (I think) "fiscal year" is effectively an adjectival phrase modifying 2005. Without this phrase, you'd just say "In 2005, we implemented..."

    Elizabeth

    Edited to ask: LRV, is this an AE/BE difference? I read a lot of U.S. financial statements, and I think the common form there is option 2.
     

    jinti

    Senior Member
    It may be an AE/BE difference.

    I write phrases like this one constantly in my (AE) reports, and I always write:

    During fiscal year (or really, I generally write FY) 2005-2006, ....
    or
    FY 05-06 was .....

    I never add the.

    Of course, anyone who disagrees with me is welcome to write my reports. ;)
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, I think it is an AE/BE difference: BE - the fiscal year. Having said that, the Americanisation of BE may now allow "fiscal year" without the "the".
     
    TrentinaNE said:
    I have always seen "fiscal year 2005" where (I think) "fiscal year" is effectively an adjectival phrase modifying 2005. Without this phrase, you'd just say "In 2005, we implemented..."

    Elizabeth

    Edited to ask: LRV, is this an AE/BE difference? I read a lot of U.S. financial statements, and I think the common form there is option 2.
    Hello Elizabeth,

    Yes I think it must be. It's also very possible that in the City of London the financiers have already adopted the AE usage. I think we are still clinging on to saying Financial Year, not Fiscal Year. We also use "Tax Year".




    LRV
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    In most contexts, it will be sufficient to write "in 2005" or "in 2005/06" without any ambiguity.

    Otherwise, I would expect to see ... No, I wouldn't. Sorry, you can see the brain grinding again.

    I'm searching in vain for the last time I heard one of our accountants talk about a fiscal year, not a financial year. And like Jinti, I see it only as FY 2005/06.

    The Tax Year is not the same as the UK public sector's financial year, which ends on 31 March.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Here's more stew to throw into the pot:

    During Fiscal Year (FY) 2004-05, XYZ Corporation showed significant growth in its manufacturing sector.

    During the 2004-05 fiscal year, XYZ Corporation showed significant...

    When using "Fiscal Year" as a title/proper noun, the article is excluded. When reversing the structure, you must include the indefinite article.

    They are interchangeable. It is a matter of stylistic preference.
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    So is it fair to say that when fiscal year modifies the date, you omit the article, but when the date modifies fiscal year, you include the article? This seems to be what you'd find without modifiers as well:

    During 2004 (no article) ==> During fiscal year 2004
    During the fiscal year (requires article) ==> During the 2004 fiscal year

    Elizabeth
     

    JRM

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    América said:
    Which one of the next two sentences is correct:

    1. In the fiscal year 2005 we implemented a pilot project...

    2. In fiscal year 2005 we implemented a pilot project...

    Thanks in advance
    Well as a person reading those sentences I understand both of them.

    The only difference that you have there is the word "the".

    If you say "the fiscal year 2005" with the whole sentence, it kind of emphasizes the year or fiscal year.

    There can be difference in the meaning of the sentence depending on what you mean if you emphasize it with "the".
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    imithe
    I have seen "fiscal 2005" written - and so would put nothing past numerate, but illiterate, financial writers.
     

    América

    Senior Member
    Español Bolivia
    Well, thank to all of you. I now understand that this was not a question only for a person whos mother lenguage is not English, so I will use Fiscal Year with out the unless I would like to emphasize something as JRM says.

    Thank all of you one more time, and sorry if I made some spelling or grammar mistakens in this post repply, but I just arrived from my french clases and I am still thinking in french :p:eek:
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Spell out something like the 1998 fiscal year on the first reference, but thereafter avoid usages such as fiscal year 1998. Write fiscal 1998 and everyone will know you're referring to a year. The buraucratic FY 1998 should be avoided except in direct quotations. (Bill Walsh, copy editor at The Washington Post)
     

    JRM

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    América said:
    Well, thank to all of you. I now understand that this was not a question only for a person whos mother lenguage is not English, so I will use Fiscal Year with out the unless I would like to emphasize something as JRM says.

    Thank all of you one more time, and sorry if I made some spelling or grammar mistakens in this post repply, but I just arrived from my french clases and I am still thinking in french :p:eek:
    One can do that in English. It also depends on the context of what your trying to express.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    GenJen54 said:
    When using "Fiscal Year" as a title/proper noun, the article is excluded. When reversing the structure, you must include the indefinite article.
    Surely you meant "definite"?
     
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